Microsoft Word

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 580
  • Published : February 9, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
ASSIGNMENT
ON
MICROSOFT WORD

What is Microsoft Word?
Microsoft Word, or Word as it is commonly known, is a software application that allows you (the user) to perform word processing. You may use Word to create documents such as letters, invitations, term papers, flyers, resumes, novels, and much more!

Microsoft Word is a proprietary word processor designed by Microsoft. It was first released in 1983 under the name Multi-Tool Word for Xenix systems. Subsequent versions were later written for several other platforms including IBM PCs running DOS (1983), the Apple Macintosh (1984), the AT&T Unix PC (1985), Atari ST (1986), SCO UNIX, OS/2, and Microsoft Windows (1989). It is a component of the Microsoft Office software system; it is also sold as a standalone product and included in Microsoft Works Suite. The current versions are Microsoft Office Word 2010 for Windows and Microsoft Office Word 2011 for Mac. Microsoft office word 2010 on window 7| Developers| Microsoft Corporation|

Stable release| 2010(14.0.4760.1000) June 15, 2010; 2 year ago| Preview release| 2013 Beta (15.0.4128.1014) / July 16, 2012; 43 days ago| Operating system| Microsoft Windows|
Type| Word processor|
License| Proprietary EULA|

DIGITAL SIGNATURE :-
Definition
A digital signature or digital signature scheme is a mathematical scheme for demonstrating the authenticity of a digital message or document. A valid digital signature gives a recipient reason to believe that the message was created by a known sender, and that it was not altered in transit. Digital signatures are commonly used for software distribution, financial transactions, and in other cases where it is important to detect forgery or tampering. A digital signature scheme typically consists of three algorithms: * A key generation algorithm that selects a private key uniformly at random from a set of possible private keys. The algorithm outputs the private key and a corresponding public key. * A signing algorithm that, given a message and a private key, produces a signature. * A signature verifying algorithm that, given a message, public key and a signature, either accepts or rejects the message's claim to authenticity. Two main properties are required. First, a signature generated from a fixed message and fixed private key should verify the authenticity of that message by using the corresponding public key. Secondly, it should be computationally infeasible to generate a valid signature for a party who does not possess the private key. Uses of digital signatures

As organizations move away from paper documents with ink signatures or authenticity stamps, digital signatures can provide added assurances of the evidence to provenance, identity, and status of an electronic document as well as acknowledging informed consent and approval by a signatory. The United States Government Printing Office (GPO) publishes electronic versions of the budget, public and private laws, and congressional bills with digital signatures. Universities including Penn State, University of Chicago, and Stanford are publishing electronic student transcripts with digital signatures.

Below are some common reasons for applying a digital signature to communications: * Authentication
Although messages may often include information about the entity sending a message, that information may not be accurate. Digital signatures can be used to authenticate the source of messages. When ownership of a digital signature secret key is bound to a specific user, a valid signature shows that the message was sent by that user. The importance of high confidence in sender authenticity is especially obvious in a financial context. For example, suppose a bank's branch office sends instructions to the central office requesting a change in the balance of an account. If the central office is not convinced that such a message is truly sent from an authorized...
tracking img