Michael Jordan's Stellar Life

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It is not very often that one person can change someone else’s life by telling a story of his or her own. Michael “Air” Jordan makes that happen. Michael played an important role in changing how people viewed great basketball and strong, hard-working athletes. Michael’s life explains to the world, how with just a little drive, great achievements can be made. Michael’s life began in Brooklyn, New York, on February 17th, 1963, where his parents James and Delores always stood by his side. His father, known for his unending support, always gave Michael advice on what to do, never letting him down. His mother made sure Michael headed in the right direction with everything he did. As a child he enjoyed athletics, engaging in basketball, baseball and football. He practiced baseball with his dad, persistently playing catch whenever time allowed. Baseball was his favorite. Even at a young age he had already tasted success by being voted Most Valuable Player on his team. “That was the first big accomplishment in my life,” Michael recalled (Harris, Laurie). As the years moved on Jordan took interest in other sports. He played basketball. He worked so hard that he decided to make the change to basketball. He tried out for his high school basketball team as a sophomore but did not make it. The coach cut him believing that Michael did not have enough experience and that he was too raw. Michael stated that it was embarrassing to not get a place on the team. Distressed, he refused to surrender himself (Brenner, Richard J 2). Michael began training continuously, constantly working on what he felt would make him a better basketball player, and he strived to prove his coach wrong. Every time he exercised and grew tired, assuming he should stop, he would shut his eyes and picture that roster without his name on it. This would empower him again making him stronger than before. Two years passed and he was a high school All-American (Brenner, Richard J 3). He had done what he felt needed in order to succeed. Countless colleges throughout the country provided him scholarships (Brenner, Richard J 3). Michael went with the University of North Carolina, making his mother extremely delighted. Delores was a huge fan of the Tar Heels basketball team. She had always wanted one of her children to go there and when Michael was offered the chance to attend, she was filled with joy (Brenner, Richard J 3). By the finish of his first year he brought enjoyment to the state of North Carolina, pulling off the winning basket in the last moment of the 1982 NCAA college championship game (Brenner, Richard J 4). While leading a team of college favorites to a gold medal at the Summer Olympics in 1984, Michael leaped far and high, playing very successfully. The Spanish team’s coach cried, “He’s not human, he’s a rubber man” (Brenner, Richard J 7). Michael’s following hurdle brought him right to the Chicago Bulls of the National Basketball Association, nervous and excited at the same time. In the 1984-85 season his big-scoring, mountain high flying custom of basketball snagged him the NBA Rookie of the Year Award (Brenner Richard J 8). In 1984 when Michael originally signed with the Chicago Bulls the NBA’s Uniform Player’s Contract enclosed a clause that precluded players from other hobbies over the off season, including playing basketball. Michael decided that there was no way he wouldn’t play basketball, something he longed to play every day. He specified that he regularly found gratification on the court, utilizing the summer to progress. He argued and fought until he got his way. The Bulls settled upon an agreement to incorporate what Michael called the “Love of the Game Clause”, which allowed him to play sports in the off season (pg 5). Michael constantly worked hard, becoming an inspiration for many people. As he made a name for himself, he wanted to be with the best, he wanted to play with the best, and wanted to beat the best. Jordan wasn’t considered a...
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