Mgmt 591 Course Project

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* Logistics at TARGET: Improving Job Satisfaction

1346 E. Berks Street
Philadelphia, PA 19125

484-571-5861
Nm4367@verizon.net
* MGMT 591 : Leadership & Organizational Behavior
October 14, 2012
Professor Plumney

Target is headquartered in Minneapolis, Minnesota and is the second largest discount retailer in the United States. Target sells softlines, hardlines, and groceries, non-perishable food, pharmaceutical products, electronics, and many household products. There are three different pyramids at Target; Headquarters, Stores, Distributions Centers. I am going to be discussing the Stores Pyramid. Currently there are 1,763 stores spread out all over the United States except for Vermont. We have several different types of store profiles. There is the General Merchandise Target Store. This is the typical discount store layout with a wide range of departments. In 2009, these layouts underwent a make-over called P-fresh. This type of prototype was now going to carry perishable and frozen foods, meat, and dairy. The next type of store is the “Greatland” Target store. This is the “old-school” version of P-fresh but in a larger setting. The other type of store is called a “Super “ Target. This offers all types of groceries in addition to the departments. They also usually have an Optical department, portrait studio, bakery, and deli. Lastly, there are now the “City” Targets. This type of layout is usually in a unique historical building in a city. This would be your typical convenient corner store type of layout. Most products that are sold are area specific. For instance the Chicago City store might offer local deep-dish pizzas. In every single one of these types of Target stores, you will find a logistics process. This is the backbone for everything happening in the store. The logistics process consists on receiving trucks from the distribution centers, pushing product to the floor, back-stocking product in the backroom, and it focuses on researching the instock levels within the store so that the store gets replenished properly. This nitty gritty type of work can be down right dirty at times. Unless the store is super low volume, this logistics process typically occurs behind the scenes, opposite of guest traffic and business hours. Keeping this process behind the scenes sometimes requires the employees who work on the logistic teams to work the third shift, or early AM hours. This team physically works the hardest but often feels the least appreciated. I will be discussing the overall job satisfaction on the logistics team and how we can make improvements. I will explain my role in Target’s organization and in which ways I am responsible for the logistics team’s culture. I am an Executive Team Leader of Human Resources. As an Executive HR Manager, I am responsible for the staffing of the store, onboarding experiences, employee relations, team development, scheduling, and team member contentment. I am responsible for always putting the team member concerns first in the store, no matter what department they work for. As Human Resources in a store, I do not always have a team working directly for me. It is my job to influence my peers, or other executives within a store, to make sure they are taking care of their teams. It is my duty to assess the culture in the store, and keep team members happy. One of the toughest teams to make happy is the logistics team. They usually work the less than desirable overnight-third shift, or early 4am shift. This team unloads trucks, and pushes product to the floor. These positions require physical labor. They will come in for their shift, and get right to work. They start unloading the Target trucks. Product is divided down a large rolling line between back-stock and push. The logistics team unloads the truck into several pallets. Half the pallets get pushed out into the store. The product is then...
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