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  • Topic: Influenza, Swine influenza, Influenza A virus subtype H1N1
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  • Published : February 25, 2013
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Swine influenza
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Swine flu)
This article is about influenza viruses in pigs. For the 2009 outbreak, see 2009 flu pandemic. For the 2009 human virus, see Pandemic H1N1/09 virus. Influenza (Flu)|
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Types|
* Avian  * A/H5N1 subtype * Canine  * Equine * Swine  * A/H1N1 subtype| Vaccines|
* 2009 pandemic  * Pandemrix * Fluzone  * Influvac * Live attenuated  * Optaflu| Treatment|
* Amantadine  * Arbidol * Laninamivir  * Oseltamivir * Peramivir  * Rimantadine * Vitamin D  * Zanamivir| Pandemics|
* 2009 swine * 1968–1969 Hong Kong * 1918|
Outbreaks|
* 2008 West Bengal * 2007 Bernard Matthews H5N1 * 2007 Australian equine * 2006 H5N1 India * 1976 swine flu| See also|
* Flu season * Influenza evolution * Influenza research * Influenza-like illness * Vaccine reformulations| * v  * t  * e|

Electron microscope image of the reassorted H1N1 influenza virus photographed at the CDC Influenza Laboratory. The viruses are 80–120 nanometres in diameter.[1] Swine influenza, also called pig influenza, swine flu, hog flu and pig flu, is an infection caused by any one of several types of swine influenzaviruses. Swine influenza virus (SIV) or swine-origin influenza virus (S-OIV) is any strain of the influenza family of viruses that is endemic inpigs.[2] As of 2009, the known SIV strains include influenza C and the subtypes of influenza A known as H1N1, H1N2, H2N1, H3N1, H3N2, andH2N3. Swine influenza virus is common throughout pig populations worldwide. Transmission of the virus from pigs to humans is not common and does not always lead to human flu, often resulting only in the production of antibodies in the blood. If transmission does cause human flu, it is called zoonoticswine flu. People with regular exposure to pigs are at increased risk of swine flu infection. During the mid-20th century, identification of influenza subtypes became possible, allowing accurate diagnosis of transmission to humans. Since then, only 50 such transmissions have been confirmed. These strains of swine flu rarely pass from human to human. Symptoms of zoonotic swine flu in humans are similar to those of influenza and of influenza-like illness in general, namely chills, fever, sore throat, muscle pains, severeheadache, coughing, weakness and general discomfort. In August 2010, the World Health Organization declared the swine flu pandemic officially over. Contents  [hide]  * 1 Classification * 1.1 Influenza C * 1.2 Influenza A * 1.3 Surveillance * 2 History * 2.1 1918 pandemic in humans * 2.2 1976 U.S. outbreak * 2.3 1988 zoonosis * 2.4 1998 US outbreak in swine * 2.5 2007 Philippine outbreak in swine * 2.6 2009 Northern Ireland outbreak in swine * 3 H1N1 virus pandemic history * 4 Transmission * 4.1 Transmission between pigs * 4.2 Transmission to humans * 4.3 Interaction with avian H5N1 in pigs * 5 Signs and symptoms * 5.1 In swine * 5.2 In humans * 5.3 Diagnosis * 6 Prevention * 6.1 In swine * 6.2 In humans * 6.2.1 Vaccination * 7 Treatment * 7.1 In swine * 7.2 In humans * 8 See also * 9 Notes * 10 Further reading * 11 External links| -------------------------------------------------

[edit]Classification
Of the three genera of influenza viruses that cause human flu, two also cause influenza in pigs, with influenza A being common in pigs andinfluenza C being rare.[3] Influenza B has not been reported in pigs. Within influenza A and influenza C, the strains found in pigs and humans are largely distinct, although because of reassortment there have been transfers of genes among strains crossing swine, avian, and human species boundaries. [edit]Influenza C

Influenza viruses infect both humans and pigs, but do...
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