Meta Cognitive Observation

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Republic of the Philippines
Western Philippines University
Puerto Princesa Campus
Puerto Princesa City

EDUC 102: FACILITATING LEARNING

“Meta-Cognitive Observation”

Submitted to:
Mrs. Marites Espanueva-Lomocso

Submitted by:
Nerissa Mae F. Dadores
Andrea Josefa D. Perez
(BSED II)

META-COGNITIVE OBSERVATION
Introduction
Metacognition refers to one’s knowledge concerning one's own cognitive processes or anything related to them, e.g., the learning-relevant properties of information or data. —J. H. Flavell (1976, p. 232). Metacognition is referred to as, as “thinking about thinking” and can be used to help students “learn how to learn.”

Metacognition is important, human uses metacognition in thinking, problem solving, learning, etc. Metacognitive involves activities such as planning how to approach a given learning task, monitoring comprehension, and evaluating progress toward the completion of a task.

This activity will help the students understand on how metacognition should be applied to improve the different study skills. Procedure
Interview 3 different children – one age 4 – 6, one age 7 – 9, one age 10 or older.

These will be semi-structured clinical interviews. Record the questions you ask and the child’s answers. You do not have to ask the questions exactly as they are posed below, but the questions should be very similar. Follow up with additional questions when children seem like they have more they can tell you. Remember to record any follow up questions you ask. You do NOT have to rewrite the notes you take while conducting the interviews, but you do need to hand them in.

Develop a list of 10 UNRELATED but common words. Take a familiar story (like a fairy tale or fable) and rewrite it so it is OUT OF ORDER (it may help to actually write out the story so that you do tell it out of order).

For a child in kindergarten or younger, follow this procedure.

Tell child that you are going to say a list of 10 words, and you want the child to remember the words and you’ll ask the child to repeat the list in a little while. Remind the child to listen closely, and then say the list slowly (about one word every second or two).

Ask the child the following series of questions:

How many words do you think you will remember? What do you need to do to remember the words? Are you good at remembering?

Do some filler questions (what are your favorite things, what do you like to do… to fill up about 5 minutes between giving the list and now).

Ask the child to list all the words you asked them to remember. (Record their list) Ask the child what did they do the help them remember? Did it work?

Tell the child you are also going to tell them a story and that you want them to listen carefully and retell the story JUST LIKE YOU TOLD IT. Tell the story you rewrote.

Bring a children’s book of appropriate age. Using the book, ask children things like, “where is the title of the book,” “where does it tell who wrote the book”, “where’s the beginning and where is the end of the book”. {These are essentially filler questions}.

Ask the child to retell the story, reminding them they should retell it in the order you told it.

Thank the child for helping you.

For a child in first grade or older, do the following:

Tell child that you are going to say a list of 10 words, and you want the child to remember the words and you’ll ask the child to repeat the list in a little while. Remind the child to listen closely, and then say the list slowly (about one word every second or two).

Ask the child the following series of questions:

How many words do you think you will remember? What do you need to do to remember the words? Are you good at remembering? What kinds of things do you do to help you remember things? Does your teacher give you ideas to help you remember things? What different ideas has your...
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