Messiah of Masses

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  • Topic: Huey Long, Louisiana State University, Alvin Olin King
  • Pages : 5 (1942 words )
  • Download(s) : 913
  • Published : December 5, 2005
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In the book Messiah of the Masses: Huey P. Long and the Great Depression, it describes and outlines the life of Huey Pierce Long. In chapter one, the author (Glen Jeansonne) begins to talk about Long's childhood days. Long was born on August 30, 1893 in Winnfield, Louisiana. Winnfield was a part of Winn Parish in the northeastern section on Louisiana. He was one of ten children born to his parents, Hugh and Caledonia (Callie) Long. Hugh Long was a man of great intelligence and charm. The family moved around a lot, and in 1907 Hugh built one of the largest homes in Winnfield, equipped with 16 rooms and all the commodities that were essential to living a successful life. Many of Huey's siblings went on to school and earned a successful job. Julius, whom was 14 years older than Huey, became the family's first attorney. This put a lot of pressure on all of the children to be successful and make something of their lives. Huey started his career at a very young age. He learned that he possessed a talent for selling things, and in 1910, he left school without a diploma and went out looking for a job. His friend from high school, Bozeman, convinced his boss to hire Long to be a traveling salesman for a seed cooking oil company. Long then realized that he could not make a living off of selling oil, so he decided to go to a different high school and earn a diploma. After graduation, Long found a job selling wholesale meats for the Houston Packing Company. Huey then began taking law classes in January 1912, and completed his first year before deciding that it was too much time and work for him. He jumped from job to job after leaving law school; he also married a woman named Rose McConnell. Then, much to his surprise, he lost his managerial job at Faultless Starch Company and his mother passed away. His life was not going the way he expected it to. His siblings Julius and Rose begged Huey to go back to law school, but he knew he didn't have enough patience for three more years of school. He decided to try and gain admittance to the bar by taking certain courses that were essential information to become a practicing lawyer. At the age of 21, he was an attorney.

In chapter two, the author talked about how Long opened his own law firm in Winnfield. Because he didn't have many clients, he had other sales jobs on the side. Long then began to grow interest in politics, and in 1918, he made his debut as a candidate for public office, he was elected as the Railroad commissioner. He had the duty of governor in mind next. Due to his extensive background in sales, he led an organized and successful campaign. His campaign manager was his brother Julius, but the two began to fight so Huey invited Cecil Morgan to become his partner. Throughout the next couple of years, Long publicized his name and let people know what his motives were. He promised to construct modern highways and provide free textbooks to children in school. As each year progressed, Long was become more popular among the other candidates. Throughout his campaign, his wife Rose remained in Shreveport with their children. Huey hired a private secretary, an attractive woman by the name of Alice Lee Grosjean (who later became Huey's mistress). Long ran for governor, but lost in the primary elections of 1923. In September of 1924, Long ran for and was reelected to the Public Service Commission.

In chapter three, Long continued his dream of becoming governor of Louisiana. From the beginning of his career to its conclusion, Long's objective was to win and hold rural Louisiana by a combination of promises, benefits, and oratory that rewarded his followers and neglected or punished those who voted against him#. Huey pushed his campaign into overdrive, trying to get everyone he could to vote for him. In 1927, Long emphasized his campaign toward the youth and gave speeches after speeches. The people who had the privilege to hear Long speak never forgot...
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