Medical Tourism in India

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CHAPTER .1

Introduction

Medical tourism in India

After the silicon rush India is now considered as the golden spot for treating patients mostly from the developed countries and Far East for ailments and procedures of relatively high cost and complexity. India is also aggressively promoting medical tourism in the current years -and slowly now it is moving into a new area of "medical outsourcing," where subcontractors provide services to the overburdened medical care systems in western countries.

India's National Health Policy declares that treatment of foreign patients is legally an "export" and deemed "eligible for all fiscal incentives extended to export earnings." Government and private sector studies in India estimate that medical tourism could bring between $1 billion and $2 billion US into the country by 2012.

Going by the Statistics and various studies it can be easily said that India would be the leader in medical tourism within the next decade if only it could improve the infrastructure and tour attractions. The question or rather the doubt that is often asked by critics is how can India provide top line medical care to outsiders while more than 40% of its people languished below poverty line and less than 20% of its people can actually afford medical services. Ethically and morally this problem has to be solved if India has to move into the category of developed country and also as a place which provides medical care to both its own people and patients from other country

The aim of this project is to put a finger on the highly profitable service of medical care combined with tourism in which India is currently considered as a market leader. It has been a known fact for past many decades that Indian doctors are highly skillful in their given field since all around the globe mot hospitals have doctors of Indian origin. Therefore it became almost natural that this trend extended to India.

This project also aims to show why India is attracting medical tourists, is it really a secure destination and how India can promote and develop this particular activity in the coming years so as face competition given by other Asian and African options.

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CHAPTER .2

Research and Methodology

Introduction

The objective of this chapter is to present the research methodology of the present study. The chapter deals with various aspects of research methodology on Medical tourism in India and a comparative analysis are made.

For the present study as more emphasis was laid down on discovery of ideas and insights is can be called descriptive research as on attempt have been made to get insight into the Medical tourism in India.

Further, the study is also and descriptive nature as a descriptive study is typically concerned with determines. Here, attempts have been made to find out the correlation of people towards Medical tourism in India.

Objective

The key objective of the project is to study the emerging opportunities and future prospects in the Indian medical tourism market. The project discusses various industry trends and growth drivers that are fuelling growth in the market and tries to study their impact on the future scenario.

Basic Research Problem of the Study

Competition and marketing issues are seen as the major problems facing organisations involved in medical tourism. Other key issues are:

• Insufficient demand
• Insurance and liability issues
• Lack of quality standards and international standards • Lack of professionalism within the industry

Assumption of the Study

According to medical tourism facilitators the leading medical tourism destinations are India, Thailand, USA, Hungary and Malaysia. The USA, UK and Russian Federation are seen as the leading source of patients both now and in the future. Countries rated as providing the best overall service to patients are Thailand, India, and Singapore....
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