Media Violence and the Effects on Youths

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Videos are a form of recording images for various purposes for example, retaining information for future references and much simpler explanation is to record memorable events and activities. But the usages of videos nowadays proved to be misleading especially on youths. Video Violence has become quite an issue in our society today.

Violence is a learned behavior. Children learn violent behaviors from their family and peers, as well as observe it in their neighborhoods and in the community at large. These behaviors are reinforced by what youth see on television, on the Internet, in video games, movies, music videos, and what they hear in their music.

Children and youths, spend on average, more than 4 hours a day with television, computers, videotaped movies, and video games. But their exposure to media varies considerably, depending on their age and parental viewing habits.

There are those people that believe that violence in television, movies and video games should be closely monitored and restricted. On the other hand, there are individuals who believe that monitoring and restricting video violence would in some way violate the rights that are awarded to us.

The debate over media violence has eluded definitive answers for more than three decades. At first blush, the debate is dominated by one question—whether or not media violence actually causes real-life violence. But closer examination reveals a political battle. On the one hand, there are those who blame media violence for societal violence and want to censor violent content to protect children. On the other hand however, are those who see regulation as the slippery slope to censorship or a smokescreen hiding the root causes of violence in society.

There appears to be evidence that exposure to violent media increases feelings of hostility, thoughts about aggression and suspicions about the motive of others. Here are examples of some:

News is now entertainment. TV news is no longer just "talking heads." From videos of the latest disaster to photos of missing children, even newspapers carry graphic headlines and photos. Most adults want children to be well informed and interested in current events, but what happens to children who watch re-enactments of crimes, see close-ups of murder victims, or experience the play-by-play excavation of trapped earthquake victims? Adults have learned to distance themselves from the tragedies being enacted in their living rooms. But children have no such defenses. Unlike any previous generation, today's parents need to confront the fears, questions and confusion today's graphic news coverage may raise in children.


1"Daniel Pearl and Nick Berg had three awful things in common. Both were Jewish Americans who were kidnapped by Islamic terrorists. Both were beheaded. And both had their excruciating deaths recorded and then replayed thousands, perhaps millions, of times over the Internet. One of the websites that featured the killing of Pearl, the Wall Street Journal reporter abducted in Pakistan in 2002, was also among the first to post the footage of Berg's execution two years later in Iraq."

The Internet is full of such fare. Another site boasts that it "collects images and information ... to present the viewer with a truly unpleasant experience." It's not news to anyone that the Internet is lavish with pornography. But videos like the Nick Berg murder are a reminder that there's something even more disturbing now spreading across the Web. Call it "violence porn" -- the latest degradation of our popular culture, in which gruesome injuries and deaths are glorified and presented in wincing detail.

And make no mistake, viewing true-life violence is catching on. With a simple click of the mouse, anyone can take a gander at someone else's nightmare. Meanwhile, a recent University of Michigan study revealed that steady exposure as a...
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