Media Interviews

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Media and Communication
Assignment

BY:
KRISHNA CHINAPIEL, GAVIN KEVEN SUNASY and SHAHEEN MADARBOCUS

2013
COHORT
BAHC/12A/FT
5/10/2013

Assignment for Media and Communication
Being on Camera – Role Play (15 minutes per group)
Step 1: Make a group of two and choose who will be the interviewer and who will be the interviewee; Step 2: Select any contemporary theme of your choice;
Step 3: Using on camera technique, choose either a soft news or a hard news interview to present to the class. Specifications:
You may undertake a survey at the MBC to gather knowledge regarding their interview process; During your visit, discuss with key staff and extract maximum information pertaining to the above; The assignment carries 30 marks per student.

Being on Camera – Role Play

BY:
KRISHNA CHINAPIEL, GAVIN KEVEN SUNASY and SHAHEEN MADARBOCUS
10TH MAY 2013
Being on Camera – Role Play
BY:
KRISHNA CHINAPIEL, GAVIN KEVEN SUNASY and SHAHEEN MADARBOCUS
10TH MAY 2013

Executive Summary
The news media help shape public opinions. This report will take into consideration the basic understanding of a reporter's job and a few interviewing techniques which can increase the effectiveness in communicating key messages in interviews.

TABLE OF CONTENT

Executive Summary| PAGE 4|
Introduction| PAGE 6|
Knowing the Media| PAGE 7|
“Bridges”| PAGE 8|
How to Master a Media Interview| PAGE 9|
Dos & Don'ts of Interviewing| PAGE 12|
Presentation| PAGE 14|
Checklist| PAGE 15|
Points to Remember| PAGE 16|
Interviewing Skills for Television ProductionThe On-Camera Interview| PAGE 17| The Live Interview in the Class| PAGE 22|
Conclusion| PAGE 27|

Introduction
Most journalists are professionals and have degrees in journalism or related fields. Although professionally trained as reporters, they are not necessarily content experts on every subject they cover. They rely on experts for facts and commentary. Reporters work in a competitive environment. Tight space, time constraints, and decisions made by editors, directors, and producers ultimately determine what stays or gets cut from a story. Reporters who write for monthly publications such as magazines have longer lead times, but television reporters often get assignments in the morning to produce news stories for the evening news. This means less time to research stories, interview sources, and write. Late-breaking news stories can bump scheduled stories to later dates or indefinitely. When information provided does not appear in a story, don’t assume the reporter has ignored it. The reporter's purposes in an interview are to:

* Gain understanding of issues
* Collect relevant facts
* Obtain quotes from reputable sources
* Balance opposing views
Contrary to common perceptions, most interviews are not investigative in nature. Reporters are trained to gather news quickly and accurately by conducting interviews with expert sources. However, their initial questions may not always convey the true nature of the interview. Always find out the nature of the interview before agreeing to do it. Reporters are human and can have preconceived notions about the topics they are covering. They also may be seeking quotes that support specific conclusions. The most important goal in an interview is not to be quoted; it’s to get the messages across. A TV interview can be as simple as asking questions of people on the street, or it can be as involved as a one-on-one, sit-down discussion with the president. Getting good answers in a TV interview can make a news story come to life and build a reputation.

Knowing the Media

You should know what type of interview you will be giving:

* Know the subject matter and how your interview fits into the bigger picture. * Ask what you will be speaking about.
* Ask how long the interview will take.
* Where and how your interview will be used. Will they be using...
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