Mcdonalds

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A company can be defined as a corporation, association, partnership, or union that carries on an industrial or commercial enterprise (Merriam-Webster’s Online Dictionary). In today’s business world, there are a plethora of companies that have become household names. Such companies have earned this merit through their impact on the economy, society, and culture. These are companies that achieved this influence through a variety of business practices. One vital business practice that every successful company possesses, especially the household names, is in the area of human relations skills. Human relations means interactions among people and the goal of human relations is to create a win-win situation by satisfying employee needs while achieving organizational objectives, thus giving the organization and employees what they want ( Lussier, 5). One particular household name company that has effectively utilized human relations skills in its ascent to the cream of the crop of the business world is McDonalds. The fast food empire has operated throughout the past several decades using numerous facets of human relations skills to achieve their immense success. There are many notable aspects of the company that human relations have played an integral role in shaping. McDonalds has been particularly keen in using human relations skills within their organizational structure, including in the areas of career stages in career management, ethics, motivating performance, leadership, organizational change and culture, as well as valuing global diversity. These have all proved to be vital in paving the path for McDonald’s to achieve its goals, and human relations has been a major factor in doing so.

Career management deals with taking responsibility for managing one’s career. Career management is comprised of career planning, career development, getting a job, career stages, and getting raises and promotions. Career planning is the process of setting career objectives and determining how to accomplish them. Career development is the process of gaining skill, experience, and education to achieve career objectives. Career stages refer to the different needs of people as they grow older during the span of their career. Human four Relations in Organizations by Robert N. Lussier breaks career stages down into different age groups: the 20s, 30s, 40s and 50s, and the 60s and 70s. Lussier describes the 20s as the time when one is beginning his/her career where they must develop the job skills needed and often work long hard hours to get ahead. The 30s are characterized as the time when mangers develop expertise and show their strength as bosses. Lussier describes the 40s and 50s as a time where one either advances to higher management, settles into middle management, seeks a new employer, or is forced into early retirement, while the 60s and 70s is designated for retirement or serving as a mentor.

This climbing of the corporate ladder is seen within McDonalds. The 20s career stage described by Lussier is represented in McDonalds through manger trainees. Manager trainees are responsible for learning and understanding McDonald's policies and procedures in order to prepare for managing shifts in a McDonald's restaurant. It is here that McDonalds promotes career development. These responsibilities include gaining experience with attaining and maintaining customer satisfaction, developing an understanding of basic supervision, human relations, interpersonal communication and follow-up skills, establishing an Individual Development Plan to help focus on personal career development objectives, and ensuring that a respectful workplace exists in the restaurant (mccalifornia.com).

The next step from here is to be promoted to the Second Assistant Manager Position where the skills learned as a Manager Trainee are put into effect. Like the 30s career stage, this is a time where expertise is harnessed and strength as a...
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