Mazda Case Study

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  • Topic: Advertising, Mazda, Wankel engine
  • Pages : 8 (2787 words )
  • Download(s) : 189
  • Published : October 30, 2012
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1.0 INTRODUCTION
Mazda has been selling cars and trucks in the highly competitive U.S. market for more than three decades. The company’s various models have always received high marks from consumers in areas such as styling, performance, reliability, and value. Sporty models such as the rotary engine RX-7, which was introduced in 1978 and was Mazda’s signature car for many years, and the Miata roadster helped the company sell nearly 400,000 cars and trucks per year in the U.S. throughout the decade of the ‘80s and into the early ‘90s. However, during the mid ‘90s Mazda embarked on an expansion program in an attempt to compete directly with Honda, Toyota and Nissan. This plan included the introduction of five new models in less than a year that resulted in a lack of focus in the company’s marketing and advertising plans. The five new models are Mazda AZ-3/MX-3, Mazda MX-6, Mazda Cronos, Mazda Millenia and Mazda RX-7. From 1994 to 1997 Mazda’s U.S. sales declined by 33 percent and reached their lowest level in 15 years as the various models were positioned primarily on the basis of value for the money. When the new president that is James E. Miller took over Mazda North American Operations in early 1997, he found an inefficient company with an image that was bouncing all around. Most of the advertising for the various Mazda models touted the prices and functional features of the cars with little attention being given to image and positioning. A change in marketing strategy as well as advertising philosophy was clearly needed if Mazda was to regain its strong position in the U.S. market.

* Company was lack of focus in the company’s marketing and advertising plans because this plan was introduce 5 new model in one year. This is effect on positioned primarily on the basis of value for the money. Then, company also reflect not good image when the new president took over Mazda North American Operations in early 1997, also found an inefficient company with an image that was bouncing all around.

2.0 ROAD TO RECOVERY

To begin its recovery, a new marketing strategy was developed which called for Mazda to refocus its efforts and target a younger generation of drivers who appreciate cars with sporty features and want to make a statement about themselves with their cars. In the fall of 1997 Mazda parted ways with its advertising agency of 27 years and awarded its business to a new agency, W.B. Doner & Co., now known as Doner. The new agency was given the charge of building an image that would capture Mazda’s overall personality and set it apart from other cars, to develop a brand DNA. They were also asked to develop an advertising theme that could be used for the Mazda brand rather than trying to establish a separate image for each model. Doner developed a simple but powerful slogan for Mazda, “Get In. Be Moved.” The slogan was seen as more than just an advertising tagline, it was a brand promise. Mazda’s group manager of brand strategy and communication noted that “It’s an invitation to the consumer; a motivation and a promise that you come to Mazda, you get in, and we promise that you’ll be moved by what our cars have to offer.”

3.0 THE ROLE OF INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATION IN:

3.1 IMC of Mazda Protégé
Television commercials. Combining computer-generated backgrounds with live action and featuring a group of hip “20-somethings” carpooling in a Protegé was one of the IMC using to launch the repositioning campaign for the Protegé, One of the most popular spots was called “Protegé World” and showed the group driving a Protegé through a surrealistic cityscape accompanied by a vocal set to music from the rock group Nails’ “88 Lines About 44 Women,” bemoaning the trials and tribulations of their workday lives. As the car drives off the screen, the voice over describes how the Protegé “is a change from your high-maintenance relationships.” Internet. Mazda kicked off what it called “the...
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