Max Weber

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  • Topic: Sociology, Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism
  • Pages : 4 (1513 words )
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  • Published : May 15, 2013
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Thinking For The Future
The Protestant Ethic and Essays in Sociology, both written by Max Weber, illustrate Weber’s observations of connections between Protestants, involved mainly in business, and Calvinists, who played a major role in the Capitalist spirits. Weber describes Calvinism as “the faith over which the great political and cultural struggles of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were fought in the most highly developed countries” (Weber, 56). Calvinists have a doctrine of predestination, which is based on God’s, predestine concerning humans and whether or not they shall be saved. Weber argues that Calvinism is the most rational religion—this, he maintains, is because they are privately steady. However, because the Puritans had the desire to work due to their calling, this forced other individuals to do so as well. Due to the Protestant callings, asceticism developed "tremendous cosmos of the modern economic order” (Weber, 121). Analyzing Weber’s observation shows the reader how Calvinism is so essential in Capitalism. This is believed because it is the will of god. People even today devote their lives determined by this method, which shows how much this belief has carried on. However, based on this belief, at times people become blinded by the goods that benefit them and really forget or ignore the true value of life. Seeing the work force start from individual’s callings ended up giving the economy more power ruling its people. The purpose in working in order to fulfill God’s requirements becomes forgotten and forces individuals to work in order to survive. This is scary for the modern society and yet in today’s society is a norm. Although the spirit of religious asceticism has faded away, it does not affect capitalism because it is no longer necessary. In other words, Weber’s argument is based on his observations, which he explains by historical circumstances, including richer districts being supervised to adapt to Protestantism....
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