Marvel Case Study

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 625
  • Published : March 6, 2010
Open Document
Text Preview
Case Study of Bankrupt and Restructuring at Marvel Entertainment Group 

1) Why is Marvel in financial distress? Bad luck? Bad strategy? Bad  implementation? When possible, back your claims with numbers.  There are several financial problems that compromise Marvel’s financial  distress. Each problem can be explained by one or several reasons.   • Over­collateral: The first financial problem of Marvel is that huge amount of  shares are collateralized as its holding companies’ debts. These debts were  secured by 77.3 million shares in total, accounting for 75.9% shares of Marvel  as a whole.  Issue Company  Marvel Holding Inc.  Marvel Parents  Holding Inc.  Marvel III Holding  Inc.  Amount   ($ Million)  517.4   251.7  125  Due  1998  1998  1998  Secured by  48.0 million Marvel shares  20.0 million Marvel shares  9.3 million Marvel shares 

Table 1. The Debt Financing of Marvel and its holding companies  Though huge amount of shares of Marvel were collateralized, Marvel’s holding  companies cannot repay these debts from their profits. These holding companies  were mainly used for providing legal and financial protection, but not generating  operating profit. As a result, the repayment of these debts only counted on  Marvel.  Reasons of over­collateralized  a. Over confidence. Perelman was over‐confident about the future of the  company. Marvel’s holding companies issued three main bonds during  Apr‐93 and Feb‐94, when the stock price of Marvel was quite high and  when the profit of Marvel was significant and still increasing.   b. Over value of IRS (internal revenue service). The primary motive of  these huge issue was to acquire 20 million shares, boosting Perelman’s  ownership more than 80%, which is the low bound of IRS.   c. Intentional Bond Defaulting. During 1993 to 1994, bonds issued by  Marvel amounted to $894 million, which would mature within 4 years.  However, at the same time, the net income of Marvel was just $61.8  million, 1/12 of bond volume. This goal can hardly be achieved in  traditional industry.   • Huge amount of outstanding long­term debt: The second problem of  Marvel was the maturing of Marvel’s long‐term debt, which was loaned  mainly from banks.   9 month      1996  1995  95.8  104.8  For the year Ended  1994  1993  69.6  19.9 

  ($ Million)  Current Liabilities   

1992  14.9  1 

Current Portion of  625.8  5.2  long‐term debt  Long‐term debt  ‐  581.3  Table 2: excerpt from Marvel’s balance sheet

20.2  364.1 

45.1  205.1 

35.1  201.2 

The long‐term debt was mainly the loan from bank, which would be outstanding  within a year. The article didn’t mention the composition of the long‐term debt  and why it will mature at the same time. A majority of current portion of long‐ term debt would be outstanding at March 31, 1997. The amount of current  portion was even larger than Marvel’s Current Assets in total in 1996.  Apparently, Marvel was not capable of repaying its long‐term debt maturing  within a year.   Reasons of huge amount of outstanding long­term debt  a. For management team, the long‐term loan from bank may not assume to  be a problem when then business went well. However, when profit turned  to negative, the bank apparently won’t lend Marvel money anymore  without renegotiation.  b. Such an amount of maturing debt at same time implied great potential  risk of operating mistake. However, the management team may not pay  enough attention on the risk.   Operating Failure: The last problem of Marvel was operating failure. The  previous two problems were solvable if Marvel generated enough operating  profit. However, this company was generating negative profit in 1995 and  1996.   For the year Ended  1994  1993  514.8  415.2  61.8  56.0  1992  223.8  32.6 

  9 month           ($ Million)  1996  1995  Net Revenues  581.2  829.3  Net Income  (27.9)  (48.4)  Table 3: excerpt from Marvel’s Income report Reasons for operating failure: 

tracking img