Martin and the Hand Greneade and Harry Wood

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In his poems “Martin and the Hand Grenade” and “Harry Wood”, Foulcher explores the ideas of the difference between adults and children in their interpretation of warfare. Foulcher also explains the ideas that man has a violet streak which can lead to destruction. In the second poem, the composer conveys the selfishness of living only to acquire wealth and how material possessions do not ultimately bring happiness and fulfillment. Foulcher uses his senses and a variety of techniques to convey his ideas and experiences.

The poems “Martin and the Hand Grenade “is based on a personal experience that Foulcher had had while teaching at a boys school in one of his history lessons. This poem portrays the idea that adults and children have a different view of war and violence. Foulcher uses a number of techniques to create a vivid image of the incident in our minds and allows us to picture ourselves observing the same thing that Foulcher describes that is happening in the classroom. Martin, a history teacher brought a defused Hand Grenade into the lesson to allow his students to observe a real weapon in which is relevant to their area of study (World War II) Just as Martin displays the Grenade, the class “pause for history “witch means that they immediately look towards the front where Martin has held the weapon. Martin continues to educate the students about the specific parts of the Grenade while to his amazement he notices that all the boys’ eyes are transfixed with interest. Foulcher specifies Martins fathers “bleak skill” that he had once taught him how to operate. Foulcher used this adjective as an effective way of conveying his own attitude to war and violence. He describes his own knowledge as “bleak” proving his negative attitude to the violence and destruction the Grenade causes. As Foulcher uses jargon to outline the Grenades parts. As he does this he informs the reader about the Grenade. One line in stanza two reads “bristles with the shrapnel...
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