Marriage and Contract

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Law & Economics
Family law: Marriage & contract

Contents

Part 1.
1. Introduction to Family law in France.
2. Conditions for Marriage between two persons.
3. Obligations out of Marriage.
Part 2.
1. New law & Economics
2. Formation and dissolution of marriage
3. Law & Economics explanation in Contract law
Part 3.
1. Gay marriage
2. Freedom of establishing Contract

Introduction:
There is multiple definition of “family” reflecting the immense diversity of this fundamental social and legal institution. The family is characterized variously as a biological relationship (parent and child, brother and sister), as a voluntary legal undertaking (registered partnership; adoption), or as a religious and social contract (marriage). Despite a widespread increase in cohabitation and other forms of non-marital union in France, marriage remains a valued institution: but if we will see statistics it is obvious that compared to previous years number of marriage is decreasing, for example if we will see statistics from bottom to top it will look like this: 1970yy- 393,700

1980yy- 334,400
2000yy- 297,922
2006yy- 268,100 registered marriages.
Marriage in France is governed by Title V (Articles 144-228) of the Civil Code.[1]
Family Structures and Economic Outcomes:
Employment and Income. Married-couple families generate the most income, on average. Young married men are more likely to be in the labour force, employed, and working a full-time job than their non married counterparts. Cohabiting men have less stable employment histories than single and married men. Married families generally earn higher incomes than stepfamilies, cohabiting families, divorced families, separated families, and single-parent families. According to one study, married couples had a median household income twice that of divorced households and four times the household income of separated households. Net Worth. Intact, married families have the greatest net worth. A family's net worth is the value of all its assets minus any liabilities it holds. Married households' net worth is attributable to more than simply having two adults in the household: a longer-term economic outlook, thrift, and greater head-of-household earning ability (the marriage premium) all contribute to greater household net worth. Poverty and Welfare. Poverty rates are significantly higher among cohabiting families and single-parent families than among married families. Over one third of single mothers live in poverty. Nearly 60 percent of non-teenage single mothers rely on food stamps or cash welfare payments. Child Economic Mobility and Well-Being. Children in married, two-parent families enjoy more economic well-being than children in any other family structure. Children in cohabiting families enjoy less economic well-being than children in married families, but more than children in single-parent families. The children of married parents also enjoy relatively strong upward mobility. By contrast, divorce is correlated with downward mobility. A non-intact family background increases by over 50 percent a boy's odds of ending up in the lowest socioeconomic level.[2]

Married Families:
Married men enjoy an income increase called the "marriage premium." Married families also tend to save more, have higher net worth, and enjoy greater net worth growth from year to year. Furthermore, the presence of both parents at home is strongly beneficial for children, giving both parents myriad more options in devising their income and parenting strategies, resulting in increased economic well-being.

Remarried Families:
Remarriage may improve women's incomes after divorce, though men who remarry after divorce have, on average, less net worth than continuously-married men. Many remarried spouses choose to keep money in separate accounts rather than pooling all their resources. Poverty is reduced by 66 percent among...
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