Marlow Lie

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 135
  • Published : May 28, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
 The Heart of Darkness} sees women from a rather Victorian viewpoint, and often paints them as being the embodiment of the more pure and gentle aspects of human nature. Conrad makes many references to a belief that women live in an ideal world which is separated from the evil side of human nature explored in the story, emphasizing that they must be protected from this darkness at all costs. This theme can be justified by many details within {\em The Heart of Darkness}, but at the same time there are a number of points in the story which stand in stark contrast to this portrayal of women as noble and exalted creatures.  One of the first incident where Conrad discusses women in an idealized manner occurs in the very beginning of {\em The Heart of Darkness}, as Marlow is about to depart for Africa. During his final meeting with his aunt, she talks to him of how noble she feels the Company's attempts to civilize the African natives are: an opinion which makes her nephew rather uncomfortable. ``It's queer,'' he says, ``how out of touch with truth women are. They live in a world of their own, and there has never been anything like it, and never can be. It is too beautiful altogether, and if they were to set it up it would go to pieces before the first sunset.'' Marlow believes that women cannot perceive the horrors that men are capable of because they are so distant from them by virtue of their sex. Another graphic example of this attitude comes when Marlow makes a reference to Kurtz's fiancee, known as his Intended. He says of her: ``Oh, she is out of it­­­completely. They­­­the women, I mean­­­are out of it­­­should be out of it. We must help them to stay in that beautiful world of their own, lest ours gets worse.'' He makes it perfectly clear in this statement that he does not feel women contribute to the evil in mankind he experiences during his trip to Africa. A second aspect of this Victorianism can be found in Conrad's descriptions of the two principle...
tracking img