Marketing Warfare

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MARKETING WARFARE
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The project is based on the idea of understanding warfare strategies and relating them to marketing strategies. Our objective to do this project is to understand and explain the basis of strategic positioning decisions. “The Economic Times” or “The Hindu Business Line” carries more blood thirsty language than is found in any of the general newspapers. “We’ll murder them”, “Its kill or be killed”, “This is a life or death struggle”, these quotes form a part of the conversation of business leaders discussing the marketing campaigns. The language of business is becoming littered with similes of war and military analogies. Articles dealing with competitive strategy are on the rise and business people frequently use military talk to describe their situations. We have marketing campaigns. We promote people. We report loses and gains. The word "strategy" is originally from a Greek word meaning "military thinking." A war situation is like a battlefield that holds strategies much like most business situations demand. Great generals like Sun Tzu, Mao Tse-tung, Napoleon, Carl Von Clausewitz, etc., have put forward the various strategies that could be adopted to steer the army to success. Strategies are the rules and guidelines by which the mission, objectives, etc., may be achieved. Business strategies for the organization as a whole include matters as diversification, organic growth, or acquisition plans, or relates to primary matters in key functional areas. With this project we shall try to relate marketing and war strategies. Linking Strategy to Marketing

However, consider the challenge faced by marketing management in a multinational business, with hundreds of business units located around the globe, producing a wide range of products. How can such management keep control of marketing decision-making in such a complex situation? This calls for well-organised marketing planning. A marketing strategy serves as the foundation of a marketing plan. A marketing plan contains a list of specific actions required to successfully implement a specific marketing strategy. An example of marketing strategy is as follows: "Use a low cost product to attract consumers. Once our organization, via our low cost product, has established a relationship with consumers, our organization will sell additional, higher-margin products and services that enhance the consumer's interaction with the low-cost product or service." Without a sound marketing strategy, a marketing plan has no foundation. Marketing strategies serve as the fundamental underpinning of marketing plans designed to reach marketing objectives. It is important that these objectives have measurable results. A good marketing strategy should integrate an organization's marketing goals, policies, and action sequences (tactics) into a cohesive whole. The objective of a marketing strategy is to provide a foundation from which a tactical plan is developed. This allows the organization to carry out its mission effectively and efficiently. What are the key issues that should be addressed in strategic and marketing planning? The following questions lie at the heart of any marketing and strategic planning process: Where are we now?

How did we get there?
Where are we heading?
Where would we like to be?
How do we get there?
Are we on course?
Why is marketing planning essential?
Businesses operate in hostile and increasingly complex environment. The ability of a business to achieve profitable sales is impacted by dozens of environmental factors, many of which are inter-connected. It makes sense to try to bring some order to this chaos by understanding the commercial environment and bringing some strategic sense to the process of marketing products and services. A marketing plan is useful to many people in a business. It can help to: Identify sources of competitive advantage

Gain...
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