Marketing Plans for Hospitals

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 53
  • Published : May 5, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
The Big List of Smart Hospital Marketing Ideas
By Melissa Speir
Ideas are the lifeblood of what we do. Particularly, smart healthcare marketing ideas that work. My colleagues and I have come across some great ones in the last few months at conferences, in blog posts, on social media and via healthcare trades.

Problem is, where are all these ideas when you need a little inspiration? Maybe tucked in the back of your head, on some Delicious posts, RSS, bookmarked pages, saved emails, Twitter favorites or a good-old-fashioned, printed-out tickler file. Maybe a little too spread out to be a good resource.

So, here are a few of our recent favorites jam-packed into one post for easy access.

From the South Carolina Hospital Association Conference in June 2010 featuring University of Maryland Medical Center’s Ed Bennett and Reed Smith, a consultant for St. David’s HealthCare in Texas (Full recap here and following #smrev)

Tell people where they can connect with you on social media every chance you get. Beyond your website, include social media icons in print ads, online banner ads and TV spots – plus direct mail, collateral, health education sessions, registration, discharge, etc. Develop custom tabs on Facebook for service lines, news, your Twitter feed, etc. UMMC features good web content on an active Ask the Expert tab. Or kill two birds with one stone like Children’s Hospital Boston, which has a Connect tab of links to all its Facebook pages, Twitter feed, YouTube channels, eBooks and more. Consider setting up profiles on user-generated sites such as Yelp, Foursquare and Gowalla so patients and families can integrate your organization in their social media outreach. Imagine them sharing “baby’s on the way” or “headed to emergency surgery”! (Not so sure? Foursquare just hit 1 million check-ins per day.) Use Facebook as another outlet to discover powerful patient stories. They often start with one unsolicited comment from a reader. Facebook walls...
tracking img