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Future of Health Care in America
Shayna Garber
Marylhurst University
Abstract
The one issue that all Americans agree on is we need to reform our health care system in some way; the part we don’t agree on is how to reform it. There will be no reform that will make every citizen happy, in truth I feel that either way we go, half of the country will be happy and half of the country will be disappointed. As a country we need to fix how the older citizens are treated, how our under privileged citizens are treated, and how to take care of all of those falling in the middle. Most civilized countries do have some form of socialized medicine and even in those countries you get a country divided. Washington has a tough job, we need affordable health care that is also good quality and can be provided to all of the citizens. Future of Health Care in America

Introduction
It seems that other countries and Americans themselves hold America in such high regard, in reality all of the countries we are compared to and comparing ourselves to have centuries more of growth and development. America is a very young country, somewhat of a prodigy in fact because we are much younger than the other civilized nations yet we are the bar they all set. Our health care system is also very young, just like any youth we are stumbling through trying to find what works and what doesn’t; trial and error is how we learn. “The patchwork of employer-supported private insurance policies and government programs that make up the U.S. health care system is far from perfect — only 15 percent of U.S. doctors think America's system works well” (The Week, 2012). Our population has grown extremely fast and our life expectancy continues to rise as well. When many of our current social programs were implemented people were not expected to live to 90-100, we now have parents and children who both qualify for Medicare at the same time. On top of the aging population living longer we also have our disabled population living much longer due to the advancements in healthcare. “By 2015, the Baby Boom population will reach 77 million. As a group, this population will live longer than preceding generations, thanks to medical advances” (Deer, 2012)

America and Canada’s Health Care
America’s health care system revolves around specialties, which is most likely why we are so healthy and have so many great medical advancements. The problem with a system centered on specialists is that primary health care type issues are not being taken care of by primary care physicians. The primary care physician should be there to filter and facilitate health care, in America we go straight to the expensive specialist before giving a the primary care physician a chance. “In Canada, the government negotiates better prices for drugs. Our Medicare drug benefit forbids that. Canadians emphasize primary care, which means a family doctor – not an expensive otolaryngologist – gets first crack at a sore throat” (Harrop, 2012). Many complaints from Canadians are the waiting lists for specialists, the down fall of their health care system would be the lack of freedom to choose and our down fall is too much freedom we need to find a happy-medium to improve the system. “Look at Canada. From 1980 through 2009, its medical spending on those 65 and older rose only 73 percent (after inflation), while American spending rose nearly 200 percent, according to a study in the Archives of Internal Medicine. Making this difference still more remarkable is that the Canadian system has not allowed deductibles and copayments since 1984” (Harrop, 2012). The initial start up will be shocking and may hurt the country economically; we are focused around our premiums and the patient’s responsibility. Currently if you are healthy you pay less than those that are not, we will have to get used to sharing the cost evenly across that board. Managed Health Care vs. Traditional Health...
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