Marketing and Harvard Business Review

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 316
  • Published : December 8, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
New Product Development– October 2009
Professor Olivier Toubia
Uris 522
ot2107@columbia.edu
TA: Rom Schrift
rys2105@columbia.edu

Course Overview
This course deals with the challenge of bringing to market elegant and efficient solutions to strong customer needs. This challenge is fundamental in customer-centric innovation, and is relevant whether you work for a startup or a large company, whether you sell products or services, and whether your customers are individual consumers or companies. We structure our learning around the following basic steps of the innovation process:

1. Opportunity identification / Idea generation
2. Design
3. Testing
4. Launch

Project
We will take on the challenge of trying to develop a new product during the week! You will apply the tools and framework covered in the course to progress through the new product development process (see checklists below). A set of projects will be offered by companies. You will select your project (and preferably form teams of 6 students) before the course starts, based on materials provided by the companies. A set of representatives from the companies will join us for dinner on Monday 10/26, and will attend your final presentations on Saturday 10/31.

Alternatively, you may propose your own project (e.g., startup idea). Please contact me before the end of August if you would like to do so.

Other assignments
Case write-ups: You are required to submit write ups for both cases discussed during the course. Write ups should be submitted BEFORE the beginning of the course (by email – ot2107@columbia.edu), should be no more than 2 pages long, and should answer the case questions from the syllabus. This is an individual assignment (“type C”). Readings: Although you are not required to hand in any report, you are expected to read the articles in depth.

1

Grading
Grading will be done as follows:
 Class participation:
 Case write-ups:
 Project:

25%
25%
50%

Schedule
Monday 10/26
8.00: Opening dinner / project and course kick-off
Tuesday 10/27
9.00-12.15: Blue Ocean Strategy + Disruptive Technologies
1.15-3.15: Project Work
3.30-4.30: Market Definition and Segmentation
Wednesday 10/28
8.30-12.00: Ideation Templates + Positioning, Perceptual Maps and Core Benefit Proposition + Conjoint Analysis
1.00-3.00: Project Work
Thursday 10/29
9.00-12.15: Involving Consumers in Idea Generation + the Voice of the Customer + the House of Quality + Confirmation Bias + Traditional Concept Testing 1.15-3.15: Project Work
3.30-4.30: Prediction Markets + Neuromarketing
Friday 10/30
9.00-12.15: Buzz Marketing + POX case
1.15-3.15: Project Work
3.30-4.30: Diffusion of Innovation
Saturday 10/31
9.00-12.15: Final Project Presentations

2

List of topics and readings
Opportunity Identification / Idea Generation
Blue Ocean Strategy
Readings:
Kim, W. Chan, and Renée Mauborgne (2004), “Blue Ocean Strategy,” Harvard Business Review.
Disruptive Technologies
Readings:
Christensen, Clayton, Richard Bohmer, and John Kenagy (2000), “Will Disruptive Innovations Cure Health Care?,” Harvard Business Review. Market definition and segmentation
Readings:
Christensen, Clayton M., Scott Cook, and Taddy Hall (2005), “Marketing Malpractice: The Cause and the Cure,” Harvard Business Review. Ideation templates
Readings:
Goldenberg, Jacob, Roni Horowitz, Amnon Levav, and David Mazursky (2003), “Finding your Innovation Sweet Spot,” Harvard Business Review. Involving consumers in idea generation
Wells, Melanie (2005), “Have it your way: How to tap customers to create new products,” Forbes.

Design
Positioning, perceptual maps and core benefit proposition
Conjoint analysis
Readings:
“Columbia Business School Case: GreenWare”
Case Questions:
Please discuss the team’s draft of the conjoint questionnaire (see file “GreenWare Draft of Conjoint Questionnaire”). Which modification(s), if any, would you recommend? Your suggestions may relate to the...
tracking img