Marketing and Buying Decision

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Principles of Marketing
Principles of Marketing
2012
Name: Robert Barnes
Student Number: 21154021
Institution: University of West London
Word count: 1455
2012
Name: Robert Barnes
Student Number: 21154021
Institution: University of West London
Word count: 1455

Table of Contents
1.0 Introduction2
2.0 Question 1 3
2.1 Personality 3
2.2 Motivation6
2.3 Conflict6
3.0 Question 2 8
Bibliography9

1.0 Introduction

The case study I have chosen to cover is “Breezing out for a night on the tiles”. It discusses the rise of the premium pre-mixed drinks industry between 1995-2000, in particular the Bacardi Breezer brand. It looks at the marketing activity which has taken place and the brand association the marketers aimed to achieve.

In this report I will be exploring the buying process involved when purchasing an alcoholic beverage, the influencing factors when making a decision and the role that marketing plays, in these decisions.

The definition of marketing is “The management process which identifies anticipates and supplies customer requirements efficiently and profitably.” Adrian Palmer 2004

Personality
noun (plural personalities)
The coon of characteristics or qualities that form an individual’s distinctive character: – Oxford Dictionary 2012

ENTJ
Frank, decisive, assume leadership readily. Quickly see illogical and inefficient procedures and policies, develop and implement comprehensive systems to solve organisational problems. Enjoy long-term planning and goal setting. Usually well informed, well read, enjoy expanding their knowledge and passing it on to others. Forceful in presenting their ideas. - Introduction to Type, Sixth Edition by Isabel Briggs-Myers 1998

2.0 Question 1
Q. Give an overview of how the buying decision-making process might work for purchasing an alcoholic drink in a pub or club. How would this differ when purchasing alcohol in a supermarket or off licence? A.

The Theory
To answer this question we first need to look at the theories in marketing associated to the buying process, influences and behaviours. Diagram 2.0 is the structure of the buying process based on the “Cognitive Paradigm” theory (Pickton and Broderick 2001) which focuses on the individuals thought process, during a buying decision. It assumes that the buying decision is approached as a problem solving activity and that the consumer is being rational throughout the process. It is widely used as the default theory by marketers and sales professionals when structuring campaigns. It does not however accurately describe the process that occurs during extreme impulse or irrational purchases, which are both, almost intangible processes. For the purpose of this exercise, we will assume that the responsible purchase of alcohol is approached, both rationally and thoughtfully.

Diagram 2.0 - The Buying Process.
(Source: Marketing Communications, by John Egan. 2007)

Step 1 of the process is the “Problem Recognition”. This is the identification of a need, such as “I am hungry, therefore I need to eat”. It can however be very complex and the consumer may require education or informing before recognising a problem exists, such as a dentist telling you, you need a filling, even though you hadn’t felt any pain in that tooth. Marketers can exploit this step by feeding information to consumers for goods and services, they hadn’t realised they needed.

Step 2 of the process is the “Information Search”. This is when an individual has identified a need but may need to research to find the right solution. For example, if a student identifies a need for a computer, but has a limited budget, he or she might research information to identify the best option for the budget they have. This step can skipped if the consumer has enough knowledge, regarding the possible solutions. Step 3 of the process is “Evaluation”. This is when more than one option is available to solve the identified need, and the consumer...
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