Marketing

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 38
  • Published : May 13, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
The Generation Gap

Today’s Workforce

Today’s Workforce
Traditionalists (1922 - 1945)
✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤

Aliases: Veterans, Silent Generation, Greatest Generation Lived through WWII and were taught core values, respect for authority Traditionalists enjoy sharing their knowledge and history High value on loyalty and hard work Want to provide more opportunity to their children than they had

Today’s Workforce
Traditionalists (1922 - 1945)
✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤

Aliases: Veterans, Silent Generation, Greatest Generation Lived through WWII and were taught core values, respect for authority Traditionalists enjoy sharing their knowledge and history High value on loyalty and hard work Want to provide more opportunity to their children than they had

Baby Boomers (1946 - 1964)
✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤

The most educated generation in history Making sacrifices to get ahead Take on big projects, want to make an impact Loyal to colleagues and employers Prefer face-to-face communication

Today’s Workforce
Generation X (1965 - 1980)
✤ ✤

Aliases: Gen X, Xers Latchkey generation, watched their parents forge a new work environment First generation to grow up with computer technology Care more about productivity than hours put into the position Good balance in work and family Requires minimal supervision

✤ ✤

✤ ✤

Today’s Workforce
Generation X (1965 - 1980)
✤ ✤

Aliases: Gen X, Xers Latchkey generation, watched their parents forge a new work environment First generation to grow up with computer technology Care more about productivity than hours put into the position Good balance in work and family Requires minimal supervision

✤ ✤

✤ ✤

Generation Y (1981 - 2000)
✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤

Aliases: Gen Y, Millennial, Echo Boomer Continually connected, speak their own language Skeptical of authority, influenced by peers Seek recognition and fame, enjoy off humor and absurdity Skim information and text quickly Easily bored, expressive and digitally creative

Perspective

Perspective

Approach

Approach

Facebook

Emailing Texting Twitter Mobile

Vs.

Faxing Memo Telephone Office Meeting

Facebook & Twitter

Workplace Behavior

Workplace Behavior
Traditionalists (Age 65 - 88)
✤ ✤ ✤ ✤

Seniority and age correlate Climb the ladder by hard work and perseverance Understand value and money (conservative) Not uncommon to have only one or two positions throughout their career Respects authority



Workplace Behavior
Traditionalists (Age 65 - 88)
✤ ✤ ✤ ✤

Seniority and age correlate Climb the ladder by hard work and perseverance Understand value and money (conservative) Not uncommon to have only one or two positions throughout their career Respects authority



Baby Boomers (Age 46 - 64)
✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤

Team Oriented Interested in health and wellness Always learning, and always loyal Workaholics Espouse value of ‘inclusive’ relationships

Workplace Behavior

Workplace Behavior
Generation X (Age 30 - 45)
✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤

Change Agents Prefer flexible work hours and informal work environment Started 80% of new businesses in the last 3 years Easy to recruit, hard to retain High value on ‘having fun’ at work Require minimal supervision

Workplace Behavior
Generation X (Age 30 - 45)
✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤

Change Agents Prefer flexible work hours and informal work environment Started 80% of new businesses in the last 3 years Easy to recruit, hard to retain High value on ‘having fun’ at work Require minimal supervision

Generation Y (Age 10 - 29)
✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤

Goal setting is a priority Can-do attitude of traditionalist Teamwork attitude of Boomers Technological savvy of X’ers Think DIFFERENTLY than any other member of the workforce

Generational Motivators

Generational Motivators
Traditionalist Motivators
✤ ✤ ✤ ✤

Loyalty is valued and rewarded Plaque for the wall Formal meetings or lunches Letting them know that their experience is appreciated and respected

Generational Motivators...
tracking img