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Market Revolution and Second Great Awakening

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Market Revolution and Second Great Awakening

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  • March 6, 2011
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The economic “market revolution” and the religious “Second Great Awakening” shaped American society after 1815. Both of these developments affected women significantly, and contributed to their changing status both inside and outside the home. Throughout time, women’s roles and opportunities in the family, workplace, and society have greatly evolved. Women’s role in the family before 1815 was based around the idea of Republican Motherhood. Republican Motherhood is the idea that children should be raised to uphold the ideals of republicanism, making them the ideal citizens of the new nation. Mothers were obligated to raise “perfect Americans”. With this belief being enforced by the males, it was impossible for the females to have the rights that they truly deserved. “Because the mother, whom God constituted the first teacher of every human being, has been degraded by men from her high office; or, what is the same thing, been denied those privileges of education which only can enable her to discharge her duty to her children with discretion and effect” states Document C. This quote enforces the idea that women felt they were being oppressed, being unable to teach their children the way that they would prefer. This leads to the idea of Domestic Feminism; which was the women’s role in the family after 1815. Domestic Feminism is the idea that women had the right to complete freedom within the home; where women controlled the decision to have fewer children. This idea was exactly what the females were fighting for. With this idea in mind, the females were able to teach what they wanted to their children. Even though women had the freedom to teach children the way they would like, some females chose to stick with the idea of Republican Motherhood. “We go in at five o’clock; at seven we come out to breakfast; at half-past seven we return to our work, and stay until half-past twelve. At one, or quarter-past one four months of the year, we return to our work, and stay...