Mark O'Connor Essay

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Discuss the ways language devices have been used to convey powerful images and communicate ideas about our natural world in at least two of O’Connor’s poems set for study and the stimulus viewed in class. “To kill an olive & Turtles Hatching + Drop into the ocean”

The famous Australian poet mark O’Connor uses the power of imagery to share with us the complexity of nature on our planet and the biodiversity that is evident in our natural environments. Mark shows these ideas by conveying confronting images of the impact of humans in their global environment. In mark’s poems “To kill and olive” and “Turtles Hatching”, he successfully shows these ideas. The Related Stimulus Text “Drop into the ocean” also conveys the idea of human interaction. The poem “To kill an olive” shows the resilience of the olive tree. The olive tree is a symbol of nature and its motivation to fight back. The repetition of ‘revive’ suggests that the olive tree is stubborn and irrepressible. The many references to time in the poem, suggests that time is not short for olive trees. Such vivid images of this allows readers to understand the stoic nature of olive trees and by association the resilience of nature.

The themes used in the poem “To kill an olive” are resilience and complexity of nature. These themes resemble that everything in nature has a purpose and that nature doesn’t give up easily. This statement is supported in the poem when it says “Hack one down, grub out a ton of main root for fuel, and next spring every side-root sends up shoots.” This is said in the poem to show that the olive tree does so much for us, yet we keep cutting it down. This part of the poem is similar to the related stimulus text “Drop into the ocean” where an image of a dead whale is shown. This image of the whale conveys that nature does things for us and as also said “planet earth is planet ocean” and all we do is kill the environment. The repetition and alliteration in “Dazzling Diversity” creates an...
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