Mark Scheme

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Mathematics tests


Mark scheme
for Paper 2 Tiers 3–5, 4–6, 5–7 and 6–8

National curriculum assessments

2007 KS3 Mathematics test mark scheme: Paper 2


The test papers will be marked by external markers. The markers will follow the mark scheme in this booklet, which is provided here to inform teachers. This booklet contains the mark scheme for paper 2 at all tiers. The paper 1 mark scheme is printed in a separate booklet. Questions have been given names so that each one has a unique identifier irrespective of tier.

The structure of the mark schemes
The marking information for questions is set out in the form of tables, which start on page 11 of this booklet. The columns on the left-hand side of each table provide a quick reference to the tier, question number, question part and the total number of marks available for that question part. The Correct response column usually includes two types of information: a statement of the requirements for the award of each mark, with an indication of whether credit can be given for correct working, and whether the marks are independent or cumulative examples of some different types of correct response, including the most common. The Additional guidance column indicates alternative acceptable responses, and provides details of specific types of response that are unacceptable. Other guidance, such as when ‘follow through’ is allowed, is provided as necessary. Questions with a UAM element are identified in the mark scheme by an encircled U with a number that indicates the significance of using and applying mathematics in answering the question. The U number can be any whole number from 1 to the number of marks in the question. For graphical and diagrammatic responses, including those in which judgements on accuracy are required, marking overlays have been provided as the centre pages of this booklet. The 2007 key stage 3 mathematics tests and mark schemes were developed by the Test Development team at Edexcel.


2007 KS3 Mathematics test mark scheme: Paper 2

General guidance

General guidance

Using the mark schemes
Answers that are numerically equivalent or algebraically equivalent are acceptable unless the mark scheme states otherwise. In order to ensure consistency of marking, the most frequent procedural queries are listed on the following two pages with the prescribed correct action. This is followed by further guidance relating specifically to the marking of questions that involve money, negative numbers, algebra, time, coordinates or probability. Unless otherwise specified in the mark scheme, markers should apply the following guidelines in all cases.


2007 KS3 Mathematics test mark scheme: Paper 2

General guidance

What if …
The pupil’s response does not match closely any of the examples given. The pupil has responded in a non-standard way. Markers should use their judgement in deciding whether the response corresponds with the statement of requirements given in the Correct response column. Refer also to the Additional guidance.

Calculations, formulae and written responses do not have to be set out in any particular format. Pupils may provide evidence in any form as long as its meaning can be understood. Diagrams, symbols or words are acceptable for explanations or for indicating a response. Any correct method of setting out working, however idiosyncratic, is acceptable. Provided there is no ambiguity, condone the continental practice of using a comma for a decimal point. In some questions, a method mark is available provided the pupil has made a computational, rather than conceptual, error. A computational error is a ‘slip’ such as writing 4 × 6 = 18 in an otherwise correct long multiplication. A conceptual error is a more serious misunderstanding of the relevant mathematics; when such an error is seen no method marks may be awarded. Examples of conceptual errors are:...
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