Marital Rape

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 97
  • Published : March 14, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
This article is about marital rape. For a related article, see Sexual violence by intimate partners. For violence between partners, see Outline of domestic violence. Sex and the law|
Social issues|
Age of consent · Antisexualism
Censorship · Circumcision
Deviant sexual intercourse
Ethics · Homophobia
Miscegenation (interracial relations)
Norms · Objectification
Pornography · Public morality
Red-light district · Reproductive rights
Same-sex marriage · Striptease
Survival sex|
Specific offences
(May vary according to jurisdiction)|
Adultery · Buggery · Child grooming
Child pornography · Child prostitution
Criminal transmission of HIV
Female genital mutilation
Incest · Pimping · Prostitution (forced)
Pedophilia · Public indecency
Rape (statutory · marital)
Seduction · Sexting · Sexual abuse (child)
Sexual assault · Sexual harassment
Slavery · Sodomy · UK Section 63 (2008)
Violence · Zoophilia|
Portals|
Sexuality · Criminal justice · Law|
* v * t * e|

Part of a series on|
Violence
against women|
Issues|
* Acid throwing * Breast ironing * Bride burning * Dating abuse * Domestic violence * Domestic violence and pregnancy * Dowry death * Honor killing * Female genital mutilation * Gishiri cutting * Infibulation * Foot binding * Forced abortion * Forced pregnancy * Forced prostitution * Human trafficking * Marital rape * Murder of pregnant women * Rape * Pregnancy from rape * Sati * Sexual slavery * Sexual violence * Violence against prostitutes| Related topics|

* Outline of domestic violence|
* v * t * e|
Marital rape, also known as spousal rape, is non-consensual sex in which the perpetrator is the victim's spouse. As such, it is a form of partner rape, of domestic violence, and of sexual abuse. Once widely condoned or ignored by law, spousal rape is now repudiated by international conventions and increasingly criminalized. Still, in many countries, spousal rape either remains legal, or is illegal but widely tolerated and accepted as a spouse's prerogative. In 2006, it was estimated that marital rape could be prosecuted in at least 104 countries (in four of these countries, marital rape could be prosecuted only when the spouses were judicially separated),[1] and since 2006 several other countries have outlawed spousal rape. In many countries it is not clear if marital rape may or may not be prosecuted under ordinary rape laws. Several countries in Eastern Europe and Scandinavia made spousal rape illegal before 1970, but other countries in Western Europe and the English-speaking Western World outlawed it much later, mostly in the 1980s and 1990s. Most developing countries outlawed it in the 1990s and 2000s. Research literature, particularly in the areas of incidence and effects, may extend the use of the term spousal/marital rape to include divorced/legally separated ex-spouses or unmarried cohabiting partners. Current state laws, however, often treat rape by ex-spouses or intimate partners as different than marital rape, and therefore, legally equivalent to rape by a stranger.[2] Contents * 1 Historical context * 2 Physical and psychological damage * 3 Legal aspect * 3.1 Formalization of the marital rape exemption in law * 3.1.1 Common law and the United Kingdom * 3.2 Feminist critique in the 19th century * 3.3 20th and 21st century criminalization * 3.3.1 United States * 3.3.2 Ending the exemption in England and Wales * 3.4 Marriage after rape * 4 Prevalence * 5 Sustaining factors * 6 Problems in prosecuting spousal rape * 7 Countries that have made spousal rape a criminal offence * 7.1 Only criminalized when couple is legally separated * 7.2 Treated as a form of noncriminal domestic violence * 8 Countries that have not made marital rape a criminal offence * 9 See also * 10 References * 11 Footnotes * 12...
tracking img