Marine Radar

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MARINE RADAR

Mentor: dr.sc. Boris Pritchard

Content:

Introduction...................................................................................................................3

1. Radar history………………………………….............................................................4

2. How the radar works.....................................................................................................5

3. Atmospheric factors affecting the radar horizon........................................................10

4. Basic radar system......................................................................................................15

Conclusion..................................................................................................................18

Introduction

Radar is an useful electronical device which detects objects on sea surface or in the air. Radar is 'searching' for an object’s signal and determining its exact location[->0]. Radar works by transmitting radio pulses[->1] and listening for an echo. That echo then can give distance of an object, rate of speed, and exact location[->2] if radar is connected to computer with appropriate software. A radar set, also called a radar system[->3], has four main parts: transmitter, and antenna, a receiver, and a indicator. Different form marine radar are Air-Search Radar Systems[->4] whose function is to maintain surveillance from the ground to high altitudes. They detect targets[->5] over larger areas of land or space. Marine and air radars work on same technical principle but difference is in computing of observed data. We belive that military radars are the most advanced radars, but technology details, priciples of operation and their purporse are behind the closed doors.

·RADAR HISTORY

It's 9pm on September 8, 1923[->6] and a U.S. Navy destroyer squadron is at sea off Honda Point, California: Just over twelve hours earlier Destroyer Squadron ELEVEN left San Francisco Bay and formed up for a morning of combat maneuvers. In an important test of engineering efficiency, this was followed by a twenty-knot run south, including a night passage through the Santa Barbara Channel. In late afternoon the fourteen destroyers fell into column formation, led by their flagship, USS Delphy. Poor visibility ensured that squadron commander Captain Edward H. Watson and two other experienced navigators on board Delphy had to work largely by the time-honored, if imprecise, technique of dead reckoning. Soundings could not be taken at twenty knots, but they checked their chartwork against bearings obtained from the radio direction

Figure 1 :Wrecked destroyers at Honda Point,1923
Source: www.history.navy.mil/library/.../radar-intro.htm

finding (RDF) station at Point Arguello, a few miles south of Honda. At the time they expected to turn into the Channel, the Point Arguello station reported they were still to the northward. However, RDF was still new and not completely trusted, so this information was discounted, and DesRon 11 was ordered to turn eastward, with each ship following Delphy. However, the Squadron was actually several miles north, and further east, than Delphy's navigators believed. It was very dark, and almost immediately the ships entered a dense fog. About five minutes after making her turn, Delphy slammed into the Honda shore and stuck fast. A few hundred yards astern, USS S.P. Lee saw the flagship's sudden stop and turned sharply to port, but quickly struck the hidden coast to the north of Delphy. Following her, USS Young had no time to turn before she ripped her hull open on submerged rocks, came to a stop just south of Delphy and rapidly turned over on her starboard side. The next two destroyers in line, Woodbury and Nicholas, turned...
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