Marijuana Illegality

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The facts cited herein are generally verifiable in the Encyclopaedia Britannica, which was printed primarily on paper produced with cannabis hemp for over 150 years. However, any encyclopedia (no matter how old) or good dictionary will do for general verification purposes.

From more than 1,000 years before the time of Christ until 1883 A.D., cannabis hemp, indeed, marijuana was our planetís largest agricultural crop and most important industry, involving thousands of products and enterprises; producing the overall majority of Earthís fiber, fabric, lighting oil, paper, incense and medicines. In addition, it was a primary source of essential food oil and protein for humans and animals.

In 1619, Americaís first marijuana law was enacted at Jamestown Colony, Virginia, ìorderingî all farmers to ìmake tryal of ì(grow) Indian hempseed. More mandatory (must-grow) hemp cultivation laws were enacted in Massachusetts in 1631, in Connecticut in 1632 and in the Chesapeake Colonies into the mid-1700s.

Benjamin Franklin started one of Americaís first paper mills with cannabis. This allowed America to have a free colonial press without having to beg or justify the need for paper and books from England.

ìThe earliest known woven fabric was apparently of hemp, which began to be worked in the eighth millennium (8,000-7,000 B.C.).î (The Columbia History of the World, 1981, page 54.)

From more than 1,000 years before the time of Christ until 1883 A.D., cannabis hemp, indeed, marijuana was our planetís largest agricultural crop and most important industry, involving thousands of products and enterprises; producing the overall majority of Earthís fiber, fabric, lighting oil, paper, incense and medicines. In addition, it was a primary source of essential food oil and protein for humans and animals.

Because cannabis hemp is, overall, the strongest, most-durable, longest-lasting natural soft-fiber on the planet. Its leaves and flower tops (marijuana) were, depending on the culture, the first, second or third most-important and most-used medicines for two-thirds of the worldís people for at least 3,000 years, until the turn of the 20th century.

Botanically, hemp is a member of the most advanced plant family on Earth. It is a dioecious (having male, female and sometimes hermaphroditic, male and female on same plant), woody, herbaceous annual that uses the sun more efficiently than virtually any other plant on our planet, reaching a robust 12 to 20 feet or more in one short growing season. It can be grown in virtually any climate or soil condition on Earth, even marginal ones.

Hemp is, by far, Earthís premier, renewable natural resource. This is why hemp is so very important.

If all fossil fuels and their derivatives, as well as trees for paper and construction were banned in order to save the planet, reverse the Greenhouse Effect and stop deforestation: Then there is only one known annually renewable natural resource that is capable of providing the overall majority of the worldís paper and textiles; meeting all of the worldís transportation, industrial and home energy needs, while simultaneously reducing pollution, rebuilding the soil, and cleaning the atmosphere all at the same time...

And that substance isóthe same one that did it all beforeó

Cannabis HempÖMarijuana!

The Battle of Bulletin 404

The Setting

In 1917, the world was battling World War I. In this country, industrialists, just beset with the minimum wage and graduated income tax, were sent into a tailspin. Progressive ideals were lost as the United States took its place on the world stage in the struggle for commercial supremacy. It is against this backdrop that the first 20th century hemp drama was played.

The Players

The story begins in 1916, soon after the release of USDA Bulletin 404 (see page 24). Near San Diego, California, a 50-year-old German immigrant named George Schlichten had been...
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