Mapping the Audio Visual Landscape : 3d

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  • Topic: 3-D film, Digital cinema, Film
  • Pages : 10 (3485 words )
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  • Published : December 16, 2012
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MFC6102 – Mapping The Audio-Visual Landscape

Analyse the role of new technologies and how present and future developments in these might impact on the film and/or television industries in terms of production, dissemination, consumption and market share. Be specific and use current examples.

Contents
. Summary

. Introduction.

. The developing industry.

. A History of 3D cinema

. The impact of Avatar

. The Box Office after Avatar

. The future of 3D in cinema.

Summary
In this report, my main aim is to explore the impact 3D has had on cinema since James Cameron’s Avatar (2009). I will discuss the development of 3D as a technology, including James Cameron’s involvement as well as how the technology has changed the face of the box office and high concept films.

Introduction
Throughout my report I am going to focus on the innovation of 3D in cinema and how it has changed the box office completely. Despite it being an expensive venture, Hollywood have embraced the introduction of 3D completely. A good deal of popcorn movies are now released in 3D, a development that has only happened since 2009 and James Cameron’s Avatar. The popularization of 3D has changed a lot about the film industry that orbits Hollywood, but it is almost excusive to Hollywood blockbusters due to its high production values and expense, obviously however, because 3D’s main domain is blockbusters, it is bound to have a lasting effect upon the box office.

For years there have been attempts at 3D technology for film, however the film that truly made a name for 3D and carved a niche in the box office for it, was Avatar , James Cameron’s revolutionary box office smash. With the success of Avatar, Hollywood studio’s started to, not only start green lighting their own 3D productions, but also started undertaking conversions on films that were already ready for release in order to cash in on Avatar’s booming 3D market that had just been established.

The 3D market has become bigger and bigger, even extending to 3D TV’s, but would all of this have been possible had James Cameron not pushed for the technology he eventually popularized? How will 3D fare in the future? And with the film industry slowly becoming a digital medium instead of a film medium, is the 3D ‘gimmick’ going to be a permanent fixture? These are all very relevant questions when talking about an industry that changes and adapts with time.

The Developing Industry

The film industry is inherently an industry that develops with both its audience and the technology that surrounds it. Hollywood’s output has to change with its audience in order to keep up with recent trends and make its money; they have to keep up with what’s popular amongst the filmgoers. As far as technology goes, Hollywood (and other film makers) has to adapt in order to stay relevant. If CGI had not been developed to the advanced stage its at now, for example, the films we see at the top of the box office would be completely different. Perhaps one of the biggest and most recent changes to the film industry is more and more filmmakers making the conversion to digital instead of film. It is a cheaper and more practical way of shooting and it also makes the editing process quicker and easier, meaning more money that comes back from the box office to the producers is directly profit. There is some film makers that, rightfully, stand up for film over digital, due to preference, such as Tarantino, ‘I actually think I’m getting jipped when I go to a movie and I realise it’s either been shot on digital or is being projected on digital.’ However despite some filmmakers holding on to old methods, some of the biggest names in cinema have embraced digital shooting, albeit begrudgingly, Scorsese’s editor, Thelma Schoonmaker was quoted saying ‘It’s just impossible to fight it anymore, the collapse of film.’. Scorsese is an interesting case study...
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