Managing People & Organisations

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MANAGING PEOPLE AND ORGANISATIONS|
OUTCOME 3 ASSESSMENT|
|

Contents
MANAGERIAL WORK2
MAIN FEATURES2
MEASURING MANAGERIAL PERFORMANCE4
BEHAVIOURAL THEORY5
McGREGOR, THEORY X & Y5
LEADERSHIP THEORIES6
SCOTIA EXPANSION & THEORIES OF LEADERSHIP7

MANAGERIAL WORK
There are three different levels of management, the first being senior level management who are concerned with the strategic planning and decision making of the organisation. The decisions they make are usually very high risk and likely to affect the whole organisation.

Then there is the tactical level management or middle management who are responsible for ensuring the goals and objectives set by senior management are enforced. This level of decision making will affect a number of people but not necessarily the whole organisation and are of moderate risk.

Lastly there is operational management who are responsible for the short term decisions within the company. These decisions will always follow company policy and procedures and will only affect certain individuals.

Managers at different levels will require different types of information in order to make effective decisions however in order to do so managers must ensure they prioritise their goals, plan to meet these goals, organise the resources required, motivate the people, coordinate the groups and control the processes. MAIN FEATURES

PLAN
Planning is an essential part of the business. It will determine what the organisational goals are and how they intend to achieve these. A plan will outline exactly how to manage a decision and what resources will be needed in order to ensure this can be tackled or completed effectively.

PRIORITISE
Due to the organisation’s “ambitious programme for expansion”, it is vital that the management effectively prioritise the goals that have been set to ensure any issues are dealt with as soon as possible before they escalate. Such a large expansion will require managers to keep on top of their workloads; this can be managed effectively by keeping to do lists, calendars, diaries and notes.

ORGANISE
All levels of management will also be responsible for the organising of different tasks and people. They will be responsible for organising the employee workloads as well as the resources needed in order to manage their positions effectively.

MOTIVATE
At work, sometimes employees can become bored and uninterested and as a manager it is your responsibility to motivate these employees to work harder. Lack of interest can stem from many different issues however the knock on effect of this is huge and these issues need to be tackled as quickly as possible before it spreads and the work declines. The management need to ensure they have the staff on their side and they enjoy their jobs in order to consistently provide a high output and quality pieces of work.

COORDINATE
Management will also be responsible for the coordination of the day to day runnings of the organisation. This will include such tasks as work rotas, workloads and breaks etc. They will also need to coordinate how they wish for the goals set to be worked towards and met.

CONTROL
Control is a huge part of a manager’s position as they need to ensure they keep on track and on top of all different types of issues. If an issue is to arise, usually the manager would be the one to try and solve this. Also they are responsible for ensuring the staff are working to the best of their abilities and turning up for work each day but also listening to their ideas and their views and taking these on board.

The managers within Scotia Airways will have to be responsible for all of these activities to ensure they meet their goals and objectives effectively. Each of these activities are equally as important as the other and at some point, if not every day, they will need to adapt these skills in order to perform to the very best standards.

MEASURING MANAGERIAL PERFORMANCE...
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