Management and Work Place

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What are the main features of Taylor's approach to 'Scientific management' and what criticisms have been made of it? Do firms use scientific management today?

Frederick Taylor was an American, born in 1856. He was an the early management consultants who shot to fame due to his book the 'Principles of Scientific management' written in 1911. Taylor called it 'scientific management' but later in time it became to be known as 'Taylorism' recognising him as the father of this idea. The thought that he came up with was to apply science to the work place in order to obtain 'maximum efficiency' with the work places out put. He used a systematic system of observing then studying the causes of inefficient in the workplace, then working out a system to eradicate that. In this essay I am going to use Taylor's book 'Principles of Scientific Management to show the main features of his approach, and show the criticisms of his approach and explore the level of use of his 'scientific management in the work place today. Taylor's view of the reason for worker's being inefficient in the workplace was that there was 'soldering' or 'natural soldering' which means that workers will always work at the pace of the of the slowest worker, so he had to devise a way for the to collectively all work faster. Or he believed that the workers inefficiency came from 'systematic soldering' which meant that they were collectively conspiring to work as slow as possible. This is due to the fact that the pay was based on the number of hours worked rather than the output that they produced which Taylor saw as the problem. Taylor wanted through his methods to gain 'maximum prosperity' not only for the firm which should be able to gain 'large dividends for the company and owner' but also that the workers may have 'maximum prosperity' for the employee so they may be able to do 'the highest grade of work the his natural abilities fit him'. It is so then argued that gaining 'maximum prosperity' for...
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