Management's Role in the Change Process

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 224
  • Published : October 19, 2009
Open Document
Text Preview
Abstract
During times of complex organizational changes, management has unrealistic expectations of the project and those impacted by the change. Employees resist change especially if they do not know why things are changing. Without knowing the “what” and “why,” people are reluctant to move from their comfort zone. Leaders must communicate with employees about the changes to come; the challenges the organization will go through during the process, why it is important to make this change now, and the benefits that will result. Consequently, management must be change agents. To make change successful, it is critical to have leaders who are actively involved in communication, endorsement, participation, and giving and receiving feedback. Leaders can use many methods for communication. The consistency of the message is important. Leaders must repeatedly show that they endorse the change. Additionally, they must actively participate, and build relationships with employees. Leaders can include all levels in the organization. The feedback loop is an important element. When a person is allowed to voice his concerns and that concern is satisfactorily listened to and addressed, the person feels they have had input to the situation. They have more control. And therefore, their comfort level is increased which will assist in the adoption of the change.

Management’s Role in Assisting Stakeholders through Organizational Change During times of complex organizational changes, management has unrealistic expectations of the project and those impacted by the change. They want business as usual. But when an organization is going through dramatic change such as implementing an enterprise software system to be used by all employees, merging together with another corporation, or altering the focus of the company, the environment is anything but business as usual. The management team may understand where they want their organization to be after the process, but they may not know how to get everyone to that desired point. It can be a difficult task to communicate the vision to the masses; to tell them what is coming and why this will be better in the long run. The employees see upper management as disconnected to what they are accomplishing. The front line knows the leaders are there because they keep sending out directives. But what do they know about the daily work the employees are doing? People tend to like their comfort zone, the familiar area they are used to and have established over time. For some employees, this comfort zone could have been established over their entire career. They want to keep doing things the way they have always done them; not change to something new. This urge to resist change is especially strong if they do not know why they are changing. Without knowing the “what” and “why,” people are reluctant to move from their comfort zone. Leaders must communicate with employees about the changes to come; the challenges the organization will go through during the process, why it is important to make this change now, and the benefits that will result. Consequently, management must be change agents. They must be the cheerleaders; communicating the rationale for making the change, the course of action that will be taken, and the expected, positive, results. Workers feel stress, anger, fear, even mourning the loss of what they know and are comfortable with. The leadership needs to be proactive to curb the negative reactions that may result. Without the guidance of the typically more experienced management, the change process falls short. Negative rumors will begin, fear will increase, and the project will not succeed. Employees may even go to an extreme of actively sabotaging the progress. Change management is a multifaceted progression. To make it successful, it is critical to have leaders who are actively involved in communication, endorsement, participation, and giving and receiving feedback. Without knowing what is...
tracking img