Man vs. Machine Surplus Theory of Value Output

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Mos 1
Steffan J Mos
02/24/13
ISF 100A essay 1
Prompt 1

Man vs. Machine Surplus Value output

Within society there has always been producers and consumers, those who work for the benefit of others to gain in return a medium of exchange of wealth and salary for personal consumption at a later time. But at what cost of these workers, what of the surplus or rather byproduct of labor that workers create for capitalists to make economic profit of the workers? Their labor-cost, according to nineteenth century German economist Karl Marx, is then able to be appropriated by Capitalist and in return allows then for economic profit/growth. This being the root of what we call capital accumulation, or the gathering of objects of value to increase wealth through concentration, allows Marx to pose then his thought on this unpaid surplus labor of workers. Karl Marx goes on to explain his theory of surplus value as a method of value a worker is weighed towards his or her employer. It is the difference of the total use of said worker and their wages being paid by the employer. However, this surplus value created by the employee is not determined by the actual output a worker producers but rather measured by the wages the employee is given by the capitalist. The amount of value that is generated by the worker is the byproduct or rather the excess of the labor produced by the worker. Marx, being socialist sees this use of exploitation of the work force for capitalists gains as wrong and poses methods of altercation to benefit the worker. Marx gives us the posed solution of mechanization Mos 2

of the work force to allow for efficiency and conservatism of the labor force. Meaning that surplus value could then be caused by the difference between the labor time embodied by the machine and the time that the machine takes to operate. We see with this method of mechanization as disabling of human factor of production and rather it allocates the human function to...
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