Malcolm X

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Malcolm X
Outline
"A man who stands for nothing will fall for anything."
Thesis Statement: Malcolm X was a courageous advocate for the rights of African Americans, a man who indicted white America in the harshest terms for its crimes against black Americans. Detractors accused him of preaching racism, black supremacy, anti-Semitism, and violence. Introduction

I. Malcolm X opposed the mainstream civil rights movement, publicly calling for black separatism and rejecting nonviolence and integration as effective means of combating racism. Body
I. Main Point 1: Hard times Malcolm X had growing up.
II. Main Point 2: How getting in trouble with law effect his way of life & how it change him forever. III. Transitional Sentence: Now that you know how Malcolm X was shape by society, I’ll explain the route that the Nation of Islam betrayal Malcolm. IV. Main Point 3: The way the Nation Islam took to assassinate Malcolm X. ; Conclusion

I. Malcolm X achieved his goal on opposed the mainstream civil rights movement, black separatism and rejecting nonviolence and integration as effective means. Malcolm X opposed the mainstream civil rights movement, publicly calling for black separatism and rejecting nonviolence and integration as effective means of combating racism; He was a courageous advocate for the rights of African Americans, a man who indicted white America in the harshest terms for its crimes against black Americans. Detractors accused him of preaching racism, black supremacy, anti-Semitism, and violence. Malcolm came from the humblest roots, was the most radical, most outspoken, and angriest “All Negroes are angry, and I am the angriest of all,” he often would say. The powerful speaker gathered huge crowds around him when he was associated with Elijah Muhammad’s Lost-Found Nation of Islam movement, and afterwards with Malcolm X’s own organization. Many Americans, white and black, were afraid of the violent side of Malcolm X’s rhetoric unlike Rev. Martin Luther King Jr’s, doctrine of non-violent resistance, Malcolm X believed in self-defense. Malcolm X’s father was a Baptist minister and a member of the United Negro Improvement Association. In a parallel belief, Nation of Islam supporters in Malcolm X’s time held that a section of the United States secede and become a nation onto itself for disenfranchised blacks. Malcolm X was born Malcolm Little, on May 19, 1925, in Omaha, NE; He died of gunshot wounds, on February 21, 1965, in Harlem, NY; He was the son of Reverend Earl (a Baptist minister), and Louise Little; Malcolm X was married Betty (a student nurse), 1958; Activist Worker in Lost-Found Nation of Islam religious sect, 1952-64, began as assistant minister of mosque in Detroit, Ml, then organized mosque in Philadelphia, PA, became national minister, 1963; established Muslim Mosque, Inc., founded Organization of Afro-American Unity in New York City, 1964; lecturer and writer. Malcolm X described in his autobiography (written with Alex Haley) the harassment of his father, including terrifying visits from the Ku Klux Klan; one of Malcolm X’s first memories is of his home in Omaha burning down. The family moved to Lansing, Michigan, in 1929 and there Malcolm X’s memories were of his father’s rousing sermons and the beatings the minister gave his wife and children. Malcolm X believed his father to be a victim of brainwashing by white people, who infected blacks with self-hatred therefore he would pass down a form of the abuse he received as a black man. After his father was killed, the state welfare representatives began to frequent the house, and it seemed to Malcolm X that they were harassing his mother. Terribly stricken by her husband’s death and buckling under the demands of raising many children, Louise Little became psychologically unstable and was institutionalized until 1963. In his autobiography, he used his own young adulthood to illustrate larger ideas about the racist climate in...
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