Making Better Place

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Most planners need to take part in planning places where they are unfamiliar with, it is important for them to get as much information as possible within limited time. According to Jacobs (1961:21), there is no perfection in planning since cities are a laboratory for testing theories, errors will be made in process. Therefore, there will be rooms for improvement. Observing the pedestrian behaviour in Coburg, the safety issues are my main concerns. However, the Moreland City Council (2011) conducted the Coburg Initiative to increase active transport by focusing on the connectivity and accessibility of Coburg. To some extent, safety is the most important issue in facilitating active transport (Barton & Tsourou, 2000:135). Therefore, safety should be put on top of connectivity and accessibility. This essay will discuss why safety is so important and should be put on top of what the planners are trying to do by analyzing the recent condition of Coburg as well as to provide solutions to the problem.

Pedestrian safety and road safety are significant issues in movement planning and it should be attained before improving connectivity and accessibility. It is claimed that going to school or work, shopping and waiting are necessary activities which related to walking, will not be affected by the physical environments (Gehl, 2006:9). However, in regardless to any reason, people should be able to walk safely in a society of freedom and choices (U.S. Department of Transport, 2006: 1). Therefore, planners should make sure the physical environment of all streets is safe enough for pedestrians walking and cycling (Barton & Tsourou, 2000:135). According to the Moreland City Council (2011), the use of active transport will be promoted by improving accessibility and connectivity. However, people will not willing to walk or cycle if it is unsafe to do so because of higher probability of accidents (U.S. Department of Transport, 2006:2). So no matter how roads and places are well...
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