Major Innovations in Technology Between 1800 C.E. to 1900 C.E. in the Americas.

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DBQ Question Project
Question: What were the major innovations in technology between 1800 C.E. to 1900 C.E. in the Americas.

Backround Information:

Industerialization

Remington Typewriter

Henry Ford
A Ford car contains about five thousand parts—that is counting screws, nuts, and all. Some of the parts are fairly bulky and others are almost the size of watch parts. In our first assembling we simply started to put a car together at a spot on the floor and workmen brought to it the parts as they were needed in exactly the same way that one builds a house. When we started to make parts it was natural to create a single department of the factory to make that part, but usually one workman performed all of the operations necessary on a small part. The rapid press of production made it necessary to devise plans of production that would avoid having the workers falling over one another….

Benjamin Franklin
"I inadvertently took the Stroke of two of those Jars thro' my Arms and Body, when they were very near full charged. It seemed a universal Blow from head to foot throughout the Body, and was followed by a violent quick Trembling in the Trunk, which wore gradually off in a few seconds. It was some Moments before I could collect my Thoughts so as to know what was the Matter; for I did not see the Flash though' my Eye was on the Spot of the Prime Conductor from whence it struck the Back of my Hand, nor did I hear the Crack though' the By-standers say it was a loud one; nor did I particularly feel the Stroke on my Hand, though' I afterwards found it had raised a Swelling there the bigness of half a Swan Shot or pistol Bullet. My Arms and Back of my Neck felt somewhat numb the remainder of the Evening, and my Breastbone was sore for a Week after, [as] if it had been bruised. What the Consequence would be, if such a Shock were taken through' the Head, I know not." - In a letter to Peter Collision, February 4, 1751
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