Main Features of Russian Industrialism in the 19th Century

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  • Topic: Hygiene, Sanitation, Endurance
  • Pages : 1 (257 words )
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  • Published : May 19, 2013
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Russian industrial workers in the 1890s worked in very harsh conditions. According to Thomas Riha, a man who inspected several mines, he described mines as "structurally defective". Miners had to endure cramped spaces, with thick air and little light. Riha found factories were filled with hazards and unhealthy conditions as well: tobacco factories had air "filled with caustic dust", and sanitary conditions promoted the spread of diseases. Russian workers, along with enduring filthy and dangerous conditions, also coped with long shifts and heavy fines.

Workers' living conditions were no better than factory ones. Huts were plainly furnished, extremely exposed, and Lionel Kochan describes them as "unhygienic to the last degree". Similarly to many factories, the sanitary conditions were very unhygienic, and inhabitants had to share their living spaces with chickens and other sickly villagers. Overall, conditions for the workers and their families were difficult and inhospitable, for they were overcrowded and diseases could easily spread.

Russian industrial workers lived and worked in very harsh conditions. According to Thomas Riha, an inspector, working areas were "structurally defective". Miners endured cramped spaces, and many factories were filled with hazards and unhealthy conditions. Along with enduring these surroundings, workers also coped with long shifts, heavy fines, and unsanitary living conditions. Inhabitants lived in bare and exposed huts, "unhygenic to the last degree". Conditions were inhospitable, and families shared their spaces with chickens and other sickly villagers. Diseases in both working and living conditions were easily spread, and much of the factories had air that was filled with "poisonous fumes".
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