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Charles Lamb
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For other uses, see Charles Lamb (disambiguation).
Charles Lamb|
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Born| 10 February 1775
Inner Temple, London, England|
Died| 27 December 1834 (aged 59)
Edmonton, London, England|
Cause of death| Erysipelas|
Known for| Essays of Elia
Tales from Shakespeare|
Relatives| Mary Lamb (sister), John Lamb (brother)|
Charles Lamb (10 February 1775 – 27 December 1834) was an English essayist, best known for his Essays of Elia and for the children's book Tales from Shakespeare, which he produced with his sister, Mary Lamb (1764–1847). Lamb has been referred to by E.V. Lucas, his principal biographer, as "the most lovable figure in English literature".[1] Contents * 1 Youth and schooling * 2 Family tragedy * 3 Work * 4 Legacy * 5 Quotations * 6 Selected works * 7 Biographical references * 8 References * 9 External links| Youth and schooling

Portrait plaque of Lamb sculpted by George Frampton
Lamb was born in London, the son of Elizabeth Field and John Lamb. Lamb was the youngest child, with an 11 year older sister Mary, an even older brother John, and 4 other siblings who did not survive their infancy. John Lamb (father), who was a lawyer's clerk, spent most of his professional life as the assistant and servant to a barrister by the name of Samuel Salt who lived in the Inner Temple in London. It was there in the Inner Temple in Crown Office Row that Charles Lamb was born and spent his youth. Lamb created a portrait of his father in his "Elia on the Old Benchers" under the name Lovel. Lamb's older brother was too much his senior to be a youthful companion to the boy but his sister Mary, being born eleven years before him, was probably his closest playmate. Lamb was also cared for by his paternal aunt Hetty, who seems to have had a particular fondness for him. A number of writings by both Charles and Mary suggest that the conflict between...