Macbeth a Critical Shakespearean Play

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Research Paper
Topic: Macbeth is Critical Shakespearean play
Course title: Research Methodology
Course code: ENM 218

Submitted to:
Farzana Zaman
Senior Lecturer
Department of English
Manarat International University,
Dhaka Bangladesh.

Submitted by:

Muhammad Abdullah Saadat
ID No. 1226ENM00127
Department of English
Manarat International University,
Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Content: Page
Abstract………………………………………………………………………. 1 Introduction…………………………………………………………………… 1 Literature Review………………………………………………………………2 Hypothesis…………………………………………………………………….. 2 Methodology……………….………………………………………………… 3 Discussion ……………………………………………………………………. 3 Macbeth: Historical Background…………..…………………………………5 Findings ……………………………………………………………………6 A. The Fall of Man…………………………………………………….. 6 B. Fortune, Fate, and Free Will……………………………………….7 C. Kingship and Natural Order………………………………………7 D. Disruption of Nature……………………………………………….8 E. Gender Roles……………………………………………………….8 F. Reason Versus Passion…………………………………………….9 Characteristics of Macbeth……………………………………………….9 Fate/Fortune………………………………………………………………10 Paradox of Life…………………………………………………………… 10 Conclusion …………………………………………………………………11 Appendix………………………………………………………..…………12 Works Cited………………………………………………………………14

Abstract
Macbeth Probably composed in late 1606 or early 1607, Macbeth is the last of Shakespeare's four great tragedies, the others being Hamlet, King Lear and Othello. It is a relatively short play without a major subplot, and it is considered by many scholars to be Shakespeare's darkest work. Lear is an utter tragedy in which the natural world is amorally indifferent toward mankind, but in Macbeth, Shakespeare adds a supernatural dimension that purposively conspires against Macbeth and his kingdom. In the tragedy of Lear, the distraught king summons the goddess of Chaos, Hecht; in Macbeth, Hecate appears as an actual character. On the level of human evil, Shakespeare's Scottish tragedy is about Macbeth's bloody rise to power, including the murder of the Scottish king, Duncan, and the guilt-ridden pathology of evil deeds generating still more evil deeds. As an integral part of this thematic web is the play's most memorable character, Lady Macbeth. Like her husband, Lady Macbeth's ambition for power leads her into an unnatural, phantasmagoric realm of witchcraft, insomnia and madness. But while Macbeth responds to the prophecies of the play's famous trio of witches, Lady Macbeth goes even further by figuratively transforming herself into an unnatural, desexualized evil spirit. The current trend of critical opinion is toward an upward reevaluation of Lady Macbeth, who is said to be dehumanized by her insanity and her suicide. Much of this reappraisal of Lady Macbeth has taken place in discussions of her ironically strong marriage to Macbeth, a union that rests on loving bonds but undergoes disintegration as the tragedy unfolds. Introduction

Macbeth is a play written by William Shakespeare. It is considered one of his darkest and most powerful tragedies. Set in Scotland, the play dramatizes the corroding psychological and political effects produced when its protagonist, the Scottish lord Macbeth, chooses evil as the way to fulfill his ambition for power. He commits regicide to become king and then furthers his moral descent with a reign of murderous terror to stay in power, eventually plunging the country into civil war. In the end, he loses everything that gives meaning and purpose to his life before losing his life itself. Macbeth is Shakespeare’s shortest tragedy, and tells the story of a brave Scottish general named Macbeth who receives a prophecy from a trio of witches that one day he will become King of Scotland. Consumed by ambition and spurred to action by his wife, Macbeth murders King Duncan and takes the throne for himself. His reign is...
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