Macbeth Soliloquy

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Even in the coolest breeze your body will turn to a ferocious sweat, your face starts burning an inferno red yet looks a ghastly white, your heart may skip a few hundred beats and you begin to feel it in your throat, the pounding intensifies with every step you take and your feet feel cemented to the ground, unable to blink, turn back and erase what you have done, everything from this point on is a downward spiral and it is too late to undo your actions, the word regret haunts you eternally. In the soliloquy, found in Act I, scene vii of Shakespeare's Macbeth servants can be found scurrying inside the castle to prepare the table for the evening's feast with the King while Macbeth, Shakespeare's title character, hesitantly paces debating the assassination of the King. A prophecy has unveiled that Macbeth will become Thane of Cawdor and Macbeth is hurried into a predicament where his future is at stake. Throughout this Soliloquy Macbeth's struggle within himself, his respect for the king, and his eternal fear of regret reveals his uneasy and apprehensive attitude towards the King's assassination.

Macbeth's soliloquy before the murder of Duncan shows the vigorous internal struggle of himself, on the one hand his ambition spurs him to strive for power and on the other his conscious resists the urge; disclosing how Macbeth will eventually bring his own downfall upon himself. It is clear from the previous scenes that Macbeth portrays many of the traditional attributes of a tragic hero; courage, intelligence, moral awareness, potential, social status and a good reputation. He also possesses many characteristics of a villain namely his harmatia which is his ambition and weakness to temptation. When Macbeth is presented in such a complicated predicament where he has to decide between moralities and personal growth, and his strong ambition and feeble resistance to temptation presents his conflict. Thoughts at the beginning of the soliloquy are his first, which is...
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