Macbeth Is the Most Evil Character in British Literature

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  • Topic: Macbeth, Evil, King Duncan
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Macbeth: The Most Evil Character in British Literature?
Throughout Shakespeare's tale, Macbeth, the character Macbeth changed drastically. His actions at beginning suggest that he has become more evil as the story goes on. Macbeth is no longer influenced by other characters. Some would say the opposite; however, the evidence in the text proves otherwise. Early on in the story, Macbeth had an internal battle with his conscience (1.7). He was planning to murder King Duncan; however, he kept worrying, and left the dinner he was hosting to collect his thoughts about it. Macbeth states, "False face must hide what the false heart doth know" (1.7.83). What this means is that the false face, or a lie, must hide what an impure heart is going to do. Right then and there, Macbeth has convinced himself that if he can get away with committing treachery, he can justify doing it. This event is crystal clear evidence of Macbeth becoming more and more evil. Macbeth also seems to not care about the lives of others as the story goes on. He kills more people and calls for the death of more people. For example, in Act 3, Macbeth has Banquo and his sons killed almost in the snap of a finger. Anyone that can cold-bloodedly have several people killed via homicide is obviously evil at heart. This is why Macbeth is the most evil character in British literature, and is absolutely evil at heart. Another thing that Macbeth does that places him on the road to an evil future is to avoid people more and more. From the tragedy's introduction to its climax, Macbeth relies less and less on his peers and companions. The text supports this theory in the beginning of the play. Macbeth is portrayed as very dependent on his wife, and in reference to the literature, Lady Macbeth was reading a letter from her husband that said everything that happened to him (1.5.1). However, as the end of the play is reached, Macbeth no longer speaks to his wife as...
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