Macbeth Causes His Own Downfall

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  • Topic: Macbeth, Murder, Macbeth of Scotland
  • Pages : 3 (985 words )
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  • Published : May 26, 2008
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In the story, Macbeth is ultimately responsible for the actions that lead to his fate .It could be argued that Macbeth is not totally to blame for his own destruction, allowing himself to be influenced by others. First, Macbeth ignores the voice of his own mind. He knows what he is doing is wrong even before he murders Duncan, but he allows Lady Macbeth and greed to cloud his judgment. Secondly, Macbeth willingly listens to the witches with no proff to believe if what they were saying was true. Macbeth could have dismissed the prophecies like Banquo did but instead he chose to believe in those miss-interpreted predictions, which ultimately lead to his own downfall.

Although the witches’ predictions are somewhat responsible for influencing Macbeth’s thoughts, no one tells Macbeth to kill Duncan. Macbeth is responsible for putting power into the hands of Lady Macbeth and letting her influence him. Finally, Macbeth acknowledges his guilt of wrong doing and is thereby responsible for his actions.. Although the witches’ predictions initiate Macbeth’s desire to become king, . When the second prophecy becomes a reality, Macbeth immediately thinks of murdering Duncan. “I am of Cawdor: If good, why do I yield to that suggestion / Whose image doth unfix my hair” (I, iii, 143-145). For the first time in the story, we see a dark side to the brave and courageous Macbeth.

Macbeth sees himself kill his ruler. Macbeth is horrified by the idea but his thoughts of going after his destiny still remain. Another example of Macbeth’s early thoughts of treachery occurs when Duncan formally names his son Malcom as his successor. “Stars, hide your fires; / Let not light see my black and deep desires: / The eye wink at the hand! yet let that be, /” (I, iv, 57-59). Macbeth is vexed at Duncan’s choice of successor and wishes to overleap the situation with murder. “This night’s great business into my dispatch; / Which shall to all our nights and days to come / Give solely sovereign...
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