Macbeth Blood Will Have Blood

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Blood will Have Blood

“These deeds must not be thought / After these ways; so, it will make us mad”(II, ii, 32-33) Translation today: A guilty conscience can make a man go crazy. In the play Macbeth, this is a recurring theme throughout one of Shakespeare’s most famous tragedies. There are many different images that help contribute to this theme such as sleep/sleeplessness, water, & children, but the most significant image would probably that of blood. Throughout the story, the characters’ guilt is exposed through images of blood. This guilty conscience caused serious mistakes, which eventually led to the downfall of Macbeth. This blood imagery adds to the guilty theme because all the characters are driven to the brink of insanity when they see blood on their own hands or in other places. This can make a character react to the people surrounding him in a unnatural way, or if it is all kept inside, these feelings might make the person totally breakdown. “Is this a dagger which I see before me, / The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee.”(II, i, 33-34) The first image Macbeth sees is right before he kills Duncan. This image is not really there, yet it makes Macbeth worried. A second later, “and on thy blade and dudgeon gouts of blood /Which was not so before. (II,i, 46-47), there was blood on that imaginary dagger. Macbeth probably appeared very serious and very worried at this time. A dark and lonely setting helped to make Macbeth’s fears even greater. This vision was the first of many that eventually drove Macbeth’s heart to be cold and his mind to grow crazy. After the murder is committed Macbeth tries to clean himself and dispose of all evidence that might lead to any suspicions of Macbeth as the guilty party.“ Will all great Neptune’s ocean wash this blood /Clean from my hand?”(II, ii, 59-60) The blood on his hands didn’t seem to be coming...
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