Macbeth Acts 4-5

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All through acts four and five we see Macbeth change dramatically. He went from a trusted thane to blood thirsty killer, killing people for no reason sometimes. Macbeth’s hubris, pathos and Macbeth’s internal struggle all become clear in these last two acts.

Macbeths hubris , overwhelming pride and confidence leading him to evil made him do a lot of bad choices like killing people because they crossed him “ Who wear our health but sickly in his life, Which in his death were perfect” (III,i,109). Macbeth started to get his hubris when he went to see the witches the second time. He learned that he could not be harmed by a man being born by a woman so he thought he was in destructible .“ Be bloody, bold, and resolute. Laugh to scorn ,The power of man, for none of woman born shall harm Macbeth.” (IV,i,81) . The fact that he arrogant and thinks he is all powerful is and was him main downfall. When lady Macbeth committed suicide he wasn’t sad, He was glad that she wasn’t unhappy anymore but he was still really okay with the fact that his wife died “She should have died hereafter. There would have been a time for such a word. Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow.” (V,v,17)

Shakespeare used pathos to make the readers feel bad for Macbeth during his downfall, for example Shakespeare wanted the reader to feel bad about Macbeth’s betrayal of Duncan by making Duncan call him “Oh valiant cousin” he wanted to show that Duncan and Macbeth were close and like a family almost. Another use of pathos was when Lady Macbeth would sleep walk and try to wash her hands because she felt guilty about Duncan and sorry for Macduff’s family. “Yet here's a spot”(V,i,34).Another use of pathos was at the end of the play when they come in with Macbeth’s head that was trying to make us feel bad about the death of Macbeth “Hail, king ! For so thou art: behold, where stands the usurper’s cursed head.”(V,viii,25) even though he went basically insane by that point.

Macbeth’s internal...
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