Macbeth Act 5 Scene 3

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The major plot lines of the scene (1 paragraph).
How does this scene fit into the rest of the play (what is the function of this scene?), in terms of character, plot, and theme?

Act 5 Scene 3

In William Shakespeare’s Act 5 Scene 3 of Macbeth, a complete different side of Macbeth is revealed. In the beginning of the play Macbeth is a man who cannot even stand up for himself, and a man who completely relies on his wife to make major decisions. Then the very next day Macbeth becomes a man who murder, the king Duncan, and then two servants, and later his best friend Banquo. This man, Macbeth, is a psychopath, he see’s s ghost of Banquo during a dinner banquet. Finally Macbeth even kills a defenseless woman and her innocent child. Macbeth’s dissent to madness becomes completely evident in Act 5 Scene 3. This scene takes place in the castle of Dunsinane and is extremely important for it revels Mactheth’s change over the course of the play and his character.

In this scene Macbeth has totally become a tyrant king who is filled with anger, hate and cockiness. In the beginning of the scene he takes his anger out on the messenger by calling him a “creamfaced loon” (Act 5.3.12) This response to the messenger is important for it shows how Macbeth is filled with rage and how he is a tyrant. His abuse of power as king is also revealed when he becomes enraged at the doctor by saying “throw psychic to the dogs”. This shows his impatience with the doctor for not being able to curing Lady Macbeth. (5.3.57-78) Macbeth continues to insult the doctor. He says to cure “cleanse the bosom of the perilous stuff”. The doctors is very insulted and states that profit again will never motivate him to come back to help Macbeth. Also in this scene Macbeth acts oddly, for example he wants to wear his armor much before the battle starts. Macbeth truly acts like a tyrant in this scene. He tells his assistant Seyton to “hang anyone who talks of fear”. (5.3.42)

Macbeth’s...
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