Macbeth Act 1 Scene 7

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Macbeth is a Shakespearean tragedy which follows the protagonist Macbeth as he plots to kill the king of Scotland and to become king himself, after hearing a prophecy from three witches. It follows Macbeth's journey of betrayal, guilt, and murder, until his final downfall. This scene details Macbeth's first soliloquy, in which he decides not to follow through with their plan of regicide, and the remainder of the scene consists of his wife, Lady Macbeth, arguing with him to change his mind. Lady Macbeth uses emotive language in contrast to he husband's logically thought out reasoning, and appeals to his sense of honour in his own masculinity by insulting it.

Before Lady Macbeth enters the scene, Macbeth decides against the plan of regicide during his soliloquy. His reasons for deciding against committing the act include reasons spurred by guilt, such as that Duncan is not only a great king, of whom Macbeth is supposedly a loyal subject, but a guest in Macbeth’s house, and Macbeth’s cousin, therefore it would be wrong to kill him. He also considers the justice of the act, as Duncan is a good man and loved by the people. Not only does Duncan do a good job leading the country, but his people would be outraged, weeping for Duncan’s death and not resting until the murderer was found. This brings Macbeth to his next reason against killing Duncan; fear for himself. Macbeth worries that he will be found out, reasoning that, even if he escapes punishment on earth, he may risk the afterlife, or punishment from the gods. Macbeth also worries about his own safety when he is king, fearing that he may meet the same fate as Duncan. Also, as he is already looked upon favourably by the lords of Scotland for his valour and courage, he is unwilling to risk his good name. He concludes his soliloquy, having reached his decision, saying “I have no spur to prick the sides of my intent, but only vaulting ambition”. All of Macbeth’s arguments are clearly thought out and logical....
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