Macauley's "Black and White"

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  • Topic: Caldecott Medal, Debut albums, Howard Talbot
  • Pages : 2 (648 words )
  • Download(s) : 78
  • Published : May 12, 2013
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“Read All Over”
Webster’s dictionary defines “story” as “an account of incidents or events”. An account, according to Webster, is “one’s description of facts, conditions, or events; narrative”. Taking both of these facts into consideration, MaCauley’s Black and White consists of four stories. These said stories may relate to each other or they may not. This relationship has no relevance to the point being conveyed: the book composes four stories.

Two sections of the book form from the youngest brother’s imagination: “Udder Chaos” and “Seeing Things”. The boy imagines things based on other sections of the book. In Udder Chaos, the boy concocts a tale of a robber wreaking havoc and causing distractions by releasing cows from an enclosure. In Seeing Things, the young boy imagines a boy, possibly himself riding a train that encounters an obstacle before reaching its destination. This obstacle turns out to be cows on the train tracks. Later, on the train with the boy, up shows the robber.(Chiasmus) Although these sections are undoubtedly related, they still provide two different stories.

“Problem Parents” and “Waiting Game” appear to be true stories, or at least not a figment of the boy’s imagination. Problem Parents tells of a story about a boy playing with his toys while his parents are away. Waiting Game tells the story of a set of onlookers awaiting the arrival of a train. Both of these stories relate based on the newspaper style clothing in both stories.

Although I believe MaCauley’s book consists of four stories, one’s opinion may differ from mine. For example, one may conclude that these four stories divide into only two stories. Seeing Things, Udder Chaos and Waiting Game could correlate into one story, and Udder Chaos and Problem Parents could stand alone. Seeing Things and Waiting Game both depict a train incurring obvious obstacles on the way to its destination. Udder Chaos and Seeing Things both include the robber’s actions. Problem Parents doesn’t...
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