M3.30 Understanding the Communication Process in the Workplace

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 304
  • Published : April 16, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
ILM Level 3 Award in First Line Management

Understanding the communications process in the Workplace.

Communication Needs

Need 1:
As Creative curriculum manager, I am required to lead and manage a small group of subject leaders (5 altogether). I must communicate with them regularly to ensure that all are aware of their roles and responsibilities, co-ordinating when and how actions will be monitored and evaluated and to ensure that everybody within the team is working towards the same goals and expectations.

Meeting need 1: In order to best meet this communication need, a forum for the whole team to meet together at the same time and discuss any required changes or actions would be the most appropriate form of oral communication.

Here the communication process would involve myself being the source of communication (1), I would have to ensure that before the meeting I had identified the purpose of the meeting and considered exactly what the message was to be (2), considered how the message was to be best delivered, e.g., the possibility of using PowerPoint, thought about the environment and whether or not biscuits would be useful (3), allowed enough time for the team to consider and discuss the message (4) ensured that I observed their reactions and body language (5), and finally, that I listened to open verbal feedback from the group.

The obvious advantage to this way of communicating with the team would be that all people within the group would have the same message delivered to them, at the same time by the same person. The message would have been carefully thought about beforehand and team members would be given an opportunity to question, discuss and make suggestions about the achievement of the message and their responses gauged.

The disadvantage to this form of communication is that the members of the team I manage are widely distributed across the various departments of our large school. All have Key Stage Leaders and are required to meet with them on a regular basis for team meetings and many run extra curricular clubs for the children. This means that there are co-ordination issues and also time restraints on people and an extra meeting would be responded to with negativity.

With this in mind, in order to meet communication need 1, a form of written communication must be considered. Because of the wide audience needed to be reached, email would be quickest and most reliable.

Here the process would involve myself being the source of communication (1), I would have to carefully plan the message to ensure that it was concise and to the point (2) I would also ensure that at this point I would get a third party, who is not a team member to read the email and give feedback on their understanding of it to make sure that it is clear, complete, concise, correct and courteous (4), I would make sure that everybody in the team was on a distribution list so that nobody was missed out of the communication (3), I would also have to make sure that I invited the team to respond to the email (5).

The obvious advantage to this form of communication is that it is very fast and easy for the source; it is easy to ensure that all team members receive the same message and have a written record. The message would be delivered in the same way to all and would have been carefully thought about and checked first.

The disadvantage to this is that emails can be very impersonal, and if used incorrectly or overused it could actually become a barrier to the communication. Also, it may be the case that even though the opportunity for feedback and questions is offered there are no real clarification opportunities and it is impossible to see the initial non-verbal response of the receiver.

Need 2:
As a member of the Senior Leadership Team it is part of...
tracking img