Lyndon B. Johnson and Civil Rights

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Civil Rights
Civil Rights
By
Willie Harris
SS310-32: Exploring the 1960s: An Interdisciplinary Approach Professor Darcy Mikal

Civil Rights 2
Just think we have the right to vote, right to speak your mind or the right to freedom. These rights were given to use by the people that sacrifice their lives so that we can live the way we live today. Now image that we did not have these rights, what did you think you would do or how you would react to this situation. Someone could claim you as property and there is nothing you could do or say about it. Would you become a leader or a follower and try to make a different in your situation or everyone else to give them the rights and freedom that they all deserve. No longer were blacks denied the right to vote, to eat, shop, and swim where they pleased, and more importantly, to attend integrated schools.  Without the Civil Rights Act of 1964, it would still be legal for people to discriminate against me based on the color of my skin.  It would be legal for a restaurant to refuse to serve me.  It would be legal for the local swimming pool to refuse to allow me to swim there.  It would even be legal for a business to refuse to hire me based on my skin color. If we could somehow imagine that the Civil Rights Movement had not worked and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 had not been passed, my life could have been very different. As Chapter 4 of “The age of great dreams, America in the 1960” by David Farber, talk how we can provide a direct and immediate way to fight for our freedom and discrimination. These movement help the world see that everyone is granted the right to do and be free like everyone else. Basic rights for everyone and the freedom to do what we want are the right of everyone. Without what the people before us did not go through and the lives that was lost we would be struggling to stay afloat. Since I am an African American, I can say that we have a lot of people to thank for what they did. I would not be to vote or do any of the other things that my white counterpart could do. My freedom would be keeping my self-alive and not getting traded to the next person. I would not Civil Rights 3 have seen the first black President or the other accomplishment that the African Americans have made during this time. Our struggles would last and who would be the first to stand up and make changes for our people. I would not have the right to sit or eat where I want to. Seeing our people going out and sitting at the counter of a fast food restaurant would take a miracle to see. We would still have to go through the back of the store just to get scraps that the other people would not want. Just getting the chance to go anywhere would be a challenge so that no one would try to kill me while walking home. The right to speak my mind without having to worry about someone trying to take me out is a right that even women wanted during the 1960s. This is a basic right that we all thank that would have gotten me shot or set on fire by saying what is on my mind. This right is the best of them all. They will always be someone suppressing my voice so that they can keep me from starting a rebelling. As I can see, I would surely have problem with this one. As I write this now, I can say that I would say I would use my voice to empower everyone, but as back then how can I say I would be the one leading the fight to give us the rights that we deserve. I would not be able to go to school and get an education. I would have to learn as much as I can from my parents and the schools that were set up for my people. We would not be able to go to any school event or go to this online school because of...
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