Lynching: Southern United States and Male Roles

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Lynching

Lynching in the South was a violent intimidation tactic used towards African Americans during the Civil Rights Movement. Lynching played a huge part during the Civil Rights Movement. Lynching had a negative effect on both blacks and whites; the justice system didn’t take lynching serious; Many African Americans were exploited for everyone to witness.

Lynching in the South had a negative effect on both African Americans and whites during the Civil Rights Movement. A lot of black men became jobless, convicted, or killed which led to many black women playing the male roles to keep their families stable. The Ku Klux Klan and mobs plans were to prevent African Americans from getting an education, job, voting, and owning their own property, so as a result they terrorized them every day. Thousands of African Americans were lynched by white mobs. Some middle class whites sought out to put an end to lynching because it had gone too far. African Americans were psychologically scarred from witnessing other African Americans being lynched.

The justice system abandoned their oversight of constitutional protections toward African Americans. Lynching could exist because the law enforcement would not prevent it. The government allowed lynching to carryon for years. Federal legislators tried to get bills passed to make lynching a federal crime but it failed. The government played a little role in protecting the safety of individuals. As a result The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People made anti-lynching campaigns; even after all the failed attempts the NAACP still was active to put an end to lynching.
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